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Soup is good food

#1 User is online   hrothgar 

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Posted 2018-December-27, 16:59

Tom Yum Soup with chicken feet and monkfish liver

Served the following soup for lunch today. I was happy with the flavor profile, thought I felt that it needed more heat. (not sure if anyone else would agree with me). For anyone who cares, here is the recipe. The making the dish requires a fair amount of advanced planning, however it’s not a particular time-consuming preparation nor does it require much in the way of technique.
Serves 10, with 4 or so quarts of leftover pork stock

Step 1: Make pork stock.

Ingredients
• 12 pounds pork neck ($2 per pound at HMART)
• 2x two pounds salmon heads
• 2 heads garlic
• 3 ounces ginger
• Three stalks lemongrass
• One pound daikon (sliced into inch thick disks)
• Handful of scallions
• Handful of sawtooth cilantro
• Bunch of celery

Directions

1. Wash pork neck
2. Place pork neck and salmon in a damn big stock pot
3. Cover with waters (bones should be completely submerged + six inches
4. Bring pot to a simmer and skim off the scum
5. Simmer for another three hours, skimming off scum
6. Add aromatics and cook for another 45 minutes or so
7. Spoon off liquid, emptying through a chinois
8. Cook liquid over night and discard fat cap

Step 2: Improve stock

Ingredients:
• Two pounds chicken feet
• 2.5 quarts pork stock

Directions

1. Process chicken feet (clean and clip off nails)
2. Shallow fry chicken feet or five minutes (frying in oil lets the feet better absorb flavors)
3. Simmer chicken feet in pork stock for two hours

Step 3: Finish soup

Ingredients:
• One pound monkfish liver (sous vided)
• Chicken feet and pork stock from step 2
• Another 2.5 quarts of pork stock
• ½ cup thai fish sauce
• Three large stalks of lemongrass, outer skin removed
• Lots of galangal (8 or so inches worth)
• 30 or so kaffir lime leaves
• Handful of sawtooth cilantro
• Large handful of birdseye chillis
• Half cup of thai green curry paste (everything through step 3 in https://www.seriouse...-chin-plaa.html)
• 40 or so thai chillis
• Double handful of cremini mushrooms
• Large can of muir glen whole tomatos
• Sugar
• Couple handfuls of small shallots
• 1.5 cups fresh squeezed lime juice
• Bunch of thin sliced scallions

Directions

• Add pork stock to stock/chicken feet
• Add fish sauce, lemongrass, galangal, lime leaves, cilantro, chillis, and curry paste. Bring to an aggressive simmer
• When the stock tastes really good, add mushrooms, scallions, and tomatoes and cook until the shrooms and scallions soften
• Use lime juice and sugar to balance out the flavor at the last minute
• Evenly divide monkfish liver into bowls. Spoon in stock, giving everyone a couple chicken feet, a tomato, a shallot or two, some a couple mushrooms
• Top with sliced scallions

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#2 User is offline   Chas_P 

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Posted 2018-December-27, 19:00

View Posthrothgar, on 2018-December-27, 16:59, said:

Tom Yum Soup with chicken feet and monkfish liver

Served the following soup for lunch today. I was happy with the flavor profile, thought I felt that it needed more heat. (not sure if anyone else would agree with me). For anyone who cares, here is the recipe. The making the dish requires a fair amount of advanced planning, however it’s not a particular time-consuming preparation nor does it require much in the way of technique.
Serves 10, with 4 or so quarts of leftover pork stock

Step 1: Make pork stock.

Ingredients
• 12 pounds pork neck ($2 per pound at HMART)
• 2x two pounds salmon heads
• 2 heads garlic
• 3 ounces ginger
• Three stalks lemongrass
• One pound daikon (sliced into inch thick disks)
• Handful of scallions
• Handful of sawtooth cilantro
• Bunch of celery

Directions

1. Wash pork neck
2. Place pork neck and salmon in a damn big stock pot
3. Cover with waters (bones should be completely submerged + six inches
4. Bring pot to a simmer and skim off the scum
5. Simmer for another three hours, skimming off scum
6. Add aromatics and cook for another 45 minutes or so
7. Spoon off liquid, emptying through a chinois
8. Cook liquid over night and discard fat cap

Step 2: Improve stock

Ingredients:
• Two pounds chicken feet
• 2.5 quarts pork stock

Directions

1. Process chicken feet (clean and clip off nails)
2. Shallow fry chicken feet or five minutes (frying in oil lets the feet better absorb flavors)
3. Simmer chicken feet in pork stock for two hours

Step 3: Finish soup

Ingredients:
• One pound monkfish liver (sous vided)
• Chicken feet and pork stock from step 2
• Another 2.5 quarts of pork stock
• ½ cup thai fish sauce
• Three large stalks of lemongrass, outer skin removed
• Lots of galangal (8 or so inches worth)
• 30 or so kaffir lime leaves
• Handful of sawtooth cilantro
• Large handful of birdseye chillis
• Half cup of thai green curry paste (everything through step 3 in https://www.seriouse...-chin-plaa.html)
• 40 or so thai chillis
• Double handful of cremini mushrooms
• Large can of muir glen whole tomatos
• Sugar
• Couple handfuls of small shallots
• 1.5 cups fresh squeezed lime juice
• Bunch of thin sliced scallions

Directions

• Add pork stock to stock/chicken feet
• Add fish sauce, lemongrass, galangal, lime leaves, cilantro, chillis, and curry paste. Bring to an aggressive simmer
• When the stock tastes really good, add mushrooms, scallions, and tomatoes and cook until the shrooms and scallions soften
• Use lime juice and sugar to balance out the flavor at the last minute
• Evenly divide monkfish liver into bowls. Spoon in stock, giving everyone a couple chicken feet, a tomato, a shallot or two, some a couple mushrooms
• Top with sliced scallions

https://www.facebook...L3hilF0fvHu93ac


This, to me, parallels Abraham Lincoln's review of a book: "For those who like this type book, this is the type book they will like." As for me, I'm like Sam Goldwyn: "Gentlemen, include me out."

#3 User is offline   The_Badger 

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Posted 2018-December-28, 04:25

I'll be honest, I'm not a lover of oriental food, but soup is good food if made properly. So is stew. can't think of anything better than a hearty homemade meat and/or vegetable soup/stew on a winter's day.
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#4 User is online   kenberg 

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Posted 2018-December-28, 09:22

A few years back recipes showed up fairly often and I hope that practice resumes. It's just a fact of my life that I was brought up to eat what was put in front of me, and I have to think a bit to recall what I ate last night, but that doesn't mean I can't enjoy a good meal when I pay a little attention to it. Becky always praises my infrequent efforts at cooking but I have a suspicion that what she likes most about it is that when I do it she doesn't have to.
But more recipes, especially ones that we might not see in an ordinary day of life, are welcome. That said, I doubt I will be trying this particular one.

Ken
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#5 User is online   Winstonm 

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Posted 2018-December-28, 13:47

I would certainly love to sample your cooking but this is out of my league as far as preparing.
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#6 User is online   hrothgar 

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Posted 2018-December-28, 14:26

View PostWinstonm, on 2018-December-28, 13:47, said:

I would certainly love to sample your cooking but this is out of my league as far as preparing.


Honestly, the prep work is all really easy. There is nothing involved other than cutting stuff into chunks and ladeling stock from one pot to another.
(And I guess, balancing out the flavors so it tastes good to you, however, that's simply knowing what you like)

The hard part is tracking down ingredients at a reasonable price.
Luckily I have a good Chinese store not too terribly far away.
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#7 User is online   Winstonm 

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Posted 2018-December-28, 16:27

View Posthrothgar, on 2018-December-28, 14:26, said:

Honestly, the prep work is all really easy. There is nothing involved other than cutting stuff into chunks and ladeling stock from one pot to another.
(And I guess, balancing out the flavors so it tastes good to you, however, that's simply knowing what you like)

The hard part is tracking down ingredients at a reasonable price.
Luckily I have a good Chinese store not too terribly far away.


Yes, finding (and knowing what to look for) are different skill sets. But the first is dependent upon the latter. I do admit an envy of your culinary skills.
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#8 User is offline   jjbrr 

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Posted 2018-December-29, 10:56

Fish sauce is criminally underrated as an ingredient in western cuisine.
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#9 User is offline   Chas_P 

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Posted 2018-December-30, 19:28

View Posthrothgar, on 2018-December-28, 14:26, said:

Honestly, the prep work is all really easy. There is nothing involved other than cutting stuff into chunks and ladeling stock from one pot to another.
(And I guess, balancing out the flavors so it tastes good to you, however, that's simply knowing what you like)

The hard part is tracking down ingredients at a reasonable price.
Luckily I have a good Chinese store not too terribly far away.


Have you offered any to the homeless in Natick?

#10 User is online   hrothgar 

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Posted 2018-December-30, 19:38

View PostChas_P, on 2018-December-30, 19:28, said:

Have you offered any to the homeless in Natick?


Go f*ck yourself, Chas...
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#11 User is offline   Chas_P 

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Posted 2018-December-30, 20:24

View Posthrothgar, on 2018-December-30, 19:38, said:

Go f*ck yourself, Chas...


Now there you go getting romantic. I'm not interested. :) I guess this means the answer to my question is, "No".

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