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Bicolor after N2 overbid

#1 User is offline   kerlouan 

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Posted 2018-June-12, 03:45

Goodmorning
Will you please advice me if in the following sequence the bicolor in economic or expensive

S 1
E 2
N 2
S 2
Is there a general rule to determine if the bicoor is economic when N2 overbid

Thank you
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#2 User is offline   Cyberyeti 

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Posted 2018-June-12, 04:09

I have no idea what you mean, those are not bridge terms in English, but in general terms E's 2 does not in any way disrupt your 1-2 auction, so 2 means whatever it would have meant without the overcall.
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#3 User is offline   kerlouan 

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Posted 2018-June-12, 08:05

Thank you for the message
Excuse me but my proposal was wrong

Her below the correct one


S 1
W 2
N 2
E No
S 2
My question was after the overcall by W is the new bid by S means 13 HLD or 18HLD
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#4 User is offline   Cyberyeti 

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Posted 2018-June-12, 10:01

View Postkerlouan, on 2018-June-12, 08:05, said:

Thank you for the message
Excuse me but my proposal was wrong

Her below the correct one


S 1
W 2
N 2
E No
S 2
My question was after the overcall by W is the new bid by S means 13 HLD or 18HLD


2 to most people would be a game try of some description, the type depending on your agreement but it's basically a "bid 4 with a good 2 bid using your holding in spades as a guide as to what's a good one".
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#5 User is offline   apollo1201 

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Posted 2018-June-13, 15:53

View Postkerlouan, on 2018-June-12, 03:45, said:

Goodmorning
Will you please advice me if in the following sequence the bicolor in economic or expensive

S 1
E 2
N 2
S 2
Is there a general rule to determine if the bicoor is economic when N2 overbid

Thank you


Maybe you can have a look at this page to avoid translation issues andso others can understand or answer better.

https://sites.google...urnoidu2juillet

Inall cases the above auction shows extras from opener.

If the bidding is 1Club - (1Spade overcall) - 2Diamonds from partner, if you bid 2❤️ it is not even a 2-suiter you could even have

Jxx
AKJx
xxx
KQx
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#6 User is offline   msjennifer 

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Posted 2018-July-03, 02:25

View PostCyberyeti, on 2018-June-12, 10:01, said:

2 to most people would be a game try of some description, the type depending on your agreement but it's basically a "bid 4 with a good 2 bid using your holding in spades as a guide as to what's a good one".

I agree fully.Partners 2H bid a limited hand bid. and so any simple new suit bid NORMALLY asks partners to reconsider his assets.Of course if you are playing SST AND LST then 2S is a transfer to 2NT after which the opener will show his second suit.asking partner to bid game if he has 3 cover cards in these two suits counting only an ACE in the remaining 2SUITS as cover card.
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#7 User is offline   dokoko 

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Posted 2018-July-21, 00:00

The notion of economic or expensive two-suiters isn't common in English bridge language. I know the terms as the "Forum D" system which is commonly taught to beginners and intermediates in Germany was derived from French Standard. In English bridge language a bid showing a "bicolor cher" is called a "reverse bid" or simply "reverse". The player involved is said to "reverse the usual order" of the suits. When the term was created it was not uncommon to bid two suits in economical order disregarding relative length. Today this is still done with 65-distribution (in some systems also holding 54/45 in the minors).

After partner's raise (your second sequence) a new suit bid by partner doesn't describe a two-suiter (pas de bicolor ni cher ni économique) but is some sort of game try.

After a new suit bid by responder (or a 1NT response) - whether competitive or not - a new suit by opener on 2-level shows a strong two-suiter (bicolor cher) if responder's bid was below 2 of the opened suit and opener's rebid is above 2 of the opened suit. To force the auction beyond two of opener's suit is a sign of strength by the player who forces not the player forced.

BTW the word "overbid" means that you bid more than you have, bidding after opponent's opening is called "overcall".
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