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How could I vote for such a vulgar disgusting man?

#421 User is offline   Winstonm 

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Posted 2018-September-03, 12:57

Here, in one simple paragraph, is the entirety of the opposition the Democratic party must find a way to overcome if they are to regain some kind of balance in our state and federal governments.


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Republican voters are primed and ready to hear that message, because the rhetoric of race on the right — particularly as propagated by Fox News and conservative talk radio — says that white people are the only racially oppressed group in America, and one key manifestation of that oppression comes in the form of snooty liberals such as Warren showering benefits on “ungrateful” minorities. The fact that, in the false story Trump tells, it is Warren herself who was supposedly the beneficiary is an unimportant detail; all Trump has to do is shout “Affirmative action!” and all the right buttons will be pushed. As we should well understand by now, the chances Trump will run a vicious negative campaign based on feeding and encouraging white racial resentment when he runs for reelection — no matter who the Democratic nominee turns out to be — are approximately 99.99 percent.


And, as it turns out, state primaries are turning out to be referendums for support of this president and his white only views.
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#422 User is offline   Al_U_Card 

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Posted 2018-September-03, 13:39

View PostWinstonm, on 2018-September-03, 12:57, said:

And, as it turns out, state primaries are turning out to be referendums for support of this president and his $green$ only views.

Does e-money have a color?
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#423 User is offline   Winstonm 

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Posted 2018-September-03, 15:36

Question I have is when does Jeff Sessions switch sides?

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WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump escalated his attacks on Attorney General Jeff Sessions on Monday, suggesting the Department of Justice put Republicans in midterm jeopardy with recent indictments of two GOP congressmen.

In his latest broadside against the Justice Department's traditional independence, Trump tweeted that "Obama era investigations, of two very popular Republican Congressmen were brought to a well publicized charge, just ahead of the Mid-Terms, by the Jeff Sessions Justice Department."

He added: "Two easy wins now in doubt because there is not enough time. Good job Jeff......"


From personal experience when I attended for one semester in 1970 an Evangelical college, there is not much more infuriating than being falsely accused. I would think Jeff Sessions would be close to his tipping point by now.

Here's another take - this from Huffington Post - on the same Labor Day tirade:

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President Donald Trump took to Twitter on Labor Day to once again air his disdain for Attorney General Jeff Sessions the rule of law.


FTP
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#424 User is offline   barmar 

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Posted 2018-September-04, 08:48

View PostAl_U_Card, on 2018-September-03, 13:39, said:

Does e-money have a color?

#008000

#425 User is offline   PassedOut 

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Posted 2018-September-04, 10:51

Looks like Woodward's new book fleshes out the details of how we all knew life in the White House is like these days: Bob Woodward’s new book reveals a ‘nervous breakdown’ of Trump’s presidency

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The 448-page book was obtained by The Washington Post. Woodward, an associate editor at The Post, sought an interview with Trump through several intermediaries to no avail. The president called Woodward in early August, after the manuscript had been completed, to say he wanted to participate. The president complained that it would be a “bad book,” according to an audio recording of the conversation. Woodward replied that his work would be “tough,” but factual and based on his reporting.

A central theme of the book is the stealthy machinations used by those in Trump’s inner sanctum to try to control his impulses and prevent disasters, both for the president personally and for the nation he was elected to lead.

Woodward describes “an administrative coup d’etat” and a “nervous breakdown” of the executive branch, with senior aides conspiring to pluck official papers from the president’s desk so he couldn’t see or sign them.

Again and again, Woodward recounts at length how Trump’s national security team was shaken by his lack of curiosity and knowledge about world affairs and his contempt for the mainstream perspectives of military and intelligence leaders.

At a National Security Council meeting on Jan. 19, Trump disregarded the significance of the massive U.S. military presence on the Korean Peninsula, including a special intelligence operation that allows the United States to detect a North Korean missile launch in seven seconds vs. 15 minutes from Alaska, according to Woodward. Trump questioned why the government was spending resources in the region at all.

“We’re doing this in order to prevent World War III,” Defense Secretary Jim Mattis told him.

After Trump left the meeting, Woodward recounts, “Mattis was particularly exasperated and alarmed, telling close associates that the president acted like — and had the understanding of — ‘a fifth- or sixth-grader.’ ”

In Woodward’s telling, many top advisers were repeatedly unnerved by Trump’s actions and expressed dim views of him. “Secretaries of defense don’t always get to choose the president they work for,” Mattis told friends at one point, prompting laughter as he explained Trump’s tendency to go off on tangents about subjects such as immigration and the news media.

Inside the White House, Woodward portrays an unsteady executive detached from the conventions of governing and prone to snapping at high-ranking staff members, whom he unsettled and belittled on a daily basis.

White House Chief of Staff John F. Kelly frequently lost his temper and told colleagues that he thought the president was “unhinged,” Woodward writes. In one small group meeting, Kelly said of Trump: “He’s an idiot. It’s pointless to try to convince him of anything. He’s gone off the rails. We’re in Crazytown. I don’t even know why any of us are here. This is the worst job I’ve ever had.”

Reince Priebus, Kelly’s predecessor, fretted that he could do little to constrain Trump from sparking chaos. Woodward writes that Priebus dubbed the presidential bedroom, where Trump obsessively watched cable news and tweeted, “the devil’s workshop,” and said early mornings and Sunday evenings, when the president often set off tweetstorms, were “the witching hour.”

Trump apparently had little regard for Priebus. He once instructed then-staff secretary Rob Porter to ignore Priebus, even though Porter reported to the chief of staff, saying that Priebus was “‘like a little rat. He just scurries around.’”

Few in Trump’s orbit were protected from the president’s insults. He often mocked former national security adviser H.R. McMaster behind his back, puffing up his chest and exaggerating his breathing as he impersonated the retired Army general, and once said McMaster dresses in cheap suits, “like a beer salesman.”

Trump told Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross, a wealthy investor eight years his senior: “I don’t trust you. I don’t want you doing any more negotiations. … You’re past your prime.”

A near-constant subject of withering presidential attacks was Attorney General Jeff Sessions. Trump told Porter that Sessions was a “traitor” for recusing himself from overseeing the Russia investigation, Woodward writes. Mocking Sessions’s accent, Trump added, “This guy is mentally retarded. He’s this dumb Southerner. … He couldn’t even be a one-person country lawyer down in Alabama.”

At a dinner with Mattis and Gen. Joseph F. Dunford Jr., the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, among others, Trump lashed out at a vocal critic, Sen. John McCain (R-Ariz.). He falsely suggested that the former Navy pilot had been a coward for taking early release from a prisoner-of-war camp in Vietnam because of his father’s military rank and leaving others behind.

Mattis swiftly corrected his boss: “No, Mr. President, I think you’ve got it reversed.” The defense secretary explained that McCain, who died Aug. 25, had in fact turned down early release and was brutally tortured during his five years at the Hanoi Hilton.

“Oh, okay,” Trump replied, according to Woodward’s account.

With Trump’s rage and defiance impossible to contain, Cabinet members and other senior officials learned to act discreetly. Woodward describes an alliance among Trump’s traditionalists — including Mattis and Gary Cohn, the president’s former top economic adviser — to stymie what they considered dangerous acts.

“It felt like we were walking along the edge of the cliff perpetually,” Porter is quoted as saying. “Other times, we would fall over the edge, and an action would be taken.”

After Syrian leader Bashar al-Assad launched a chemical attack on civilians in April 2017, Trump called Mattis and said he wanted to assassinate the dictator. “Let’s ***** kill him! Let’s go in. Let’s kill the ***** lot of them,” Trump said, according to Woodward.

Mattis told the president that he would get right on it. But after hanging up the phone, he told a senior aide: “We’re not going to do any of that. We’re going to be much more measured.” The national security team developed options for the more conventional airstrike that Trump ultimately ordered.

Cohn, a Wall Street veteran, tried to tamp down Trump’s strident nationalism regarding trade. According to Woodward, Cohn “stole a letter off Trump’s desk” that the president was intending to sign to formally withdraw the United States from a trade agreement with South Korea. Cohn later told an associate that he removed the letter to protect national security and that Trump did not notice that it was missing.

Cohn made a similar play to prevent Trump from pulling the United States out of the North American Free Trade Agreement, something the president has long threatened to do. In spring 2017, Trump was eager to withdraw from NAFTA and told Porter: “Why aren’t we getting this done? Do your job. It’s tap, tap, tap. You’re just tapping me along. I want to do this.”

Under orders from the president, Porter drafted a notification letter withdrawing from NAFTA. But he and other advisers worried that it could trigger an economic and foreign relations crisis. So Porter consulted Cohn, who told him, according to Woodward: “I can stop this. I’ll just take the paper off his desk.”

Despite repeated threats by Trump, the United States has remained in both pacts. The administration continues to negotiate new terms with South Korea as well as with its NAFTA partners, Canada and Mexico.

Cohn came to regard the president as “a professional liar” and threatened to resign in August 2017 over Trump’s handling of a deadly white supremacist rally in Charlottesville. Cohn, who is Jewish, was especially shaken when one of his daughters found a swastika on her college dorm room.

Trump was sharply criticized for initially saying that “both sides” were to blame. At the urging of advisers, he then condemned white supremacists and neo-Nazis, but almost immediately told aides, “That was the biggest ***** mistake I’ve made” and the “worst speech I’ve ever given,” according to Woodward’s account.

When Cohn met with Trump to deliver his resignation letter after Charlottesville, the president told him, “This is treason,” and persuaded his economic adviser to stay on. Kelly then confided to Cohn that he shared Cohn’s horror at Trump’s handling of the tragedy — and shared Cohn’s fury with Trump.

“I would have taken that resignation letter and shoved it up his ass six different times,” Kelly told Cohn, according to Woodward. Kelly himself has threatened to quit several times, but has not done so.

I always want both parties to nominate their best candidate because there's always a chance that either could be elected. This is what happens when a party makes a disastrous presidential nomination and then the long-shot comes home.

I don't really hate Trump--he's just an incompetent doofus in way over his head, but that should have been apparent to everyone well before the nomination. The primary elections have gotten rid of the nominations decided in "smoke-filled rooms," as was common when I was a kid, and that is generally a good thing. But there's also a risk involved, as this past election has made clear.
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#426 User is offline   Winstonm 

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Posted 2018-September-04, 14:31

Question of the day: Is Fox News becoming an enemy of all people and democracy itself?

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Fox News host Tucker Carlson slammed Colin Kaepernick and Nike executives on Tuesday, calling their collaboration on a controversial new ad “an attack on the country.”

Appearing on “Fox and Friends,” Carlson took particular aim at the Nike officials for featuring Kaepernick in the spot for the 30th anniversary of the company’s “Just do it” campaign. A picture of Kaepernik appears with the tagline: “Believe in something, even if it means sacrificing everything,” referring to the price the pro football quarterback has paid for helping instigate protests by NFL players during the playing of the national anthem.

Carlson said “there’s something decadent” about the ad, insisting it shows that some of nation’s “the most successful people” hate U.S. society. “And it’s a metaphor for our entire ruling class, many of whom feel that way,” he insisted. “They hate and resent the very system that made their prosperity, their success possible.

He later characterized the ad in apocalyptic terms, saying Nike’s “attack” on this country is how “everything falls apart.”


The goal of Fox - an instituted by Roger Ailes - is to polarize the country and turn opposition into enemies to be resisted at all cost - in this way the party does not have to have any message other than "We are not them."
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#427 User is offline   johnu 

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Posted 2018-September-04, 14:43

View PostWinstonm, on 2018-September-04, 14:31, said:

Question of the day: Is Fox News becoming an enemy of all people and democracy itself?


Are you talking about the Fox Propaganda Channel?
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#428 User is offline   Winstonm 

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Posted 2018-November-16, 21:25

Another reason to be proud.

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President Donald Trump loves to talk about his love of U.S. soldiers, but did absolutely nothing to honor them on Veterans Day because he was “busy on calls.”

In an interview with Fox News Sunday’s Chris Wallace airing later this weekend, the host asked the president why he didn’t visit Arlington National Cemetery on the holiday honoring U.S. veterans.

“I should have done that, I was extremely busy on calls for the country, we did a lot of calling as you know,” Trump said, according to a partial transcript of the interview given to reporters.

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