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Control Precision 1 What is Control Precision

#1 User is offline   Bermy 

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Posted 2017-September-10, 02:29

What is Control Precision?



Bridge is a complex game, full of the mystique of the playing cards. We use all 52 cards, except the Jokers. We understand the power and nature of the Aces, Kings, Queens, Jacks, Tens and even Nines. We differentiate between the odd and even cards, as well as the high and low little ones. Each suite has 13 soldiers. We differentiate between the suites who themselves have their rank and understand the value of being short, or long in a particular suites. The players and the scoring put it all together. But the mystique, when combined with pure logic is undoubtedly part of the intrigue of the game. When I put Control Precision together many years ago, the mystique started coming together, like the pieces in a jigsaw puzzle. I started seeing things no one ever saw before. By the process of elimination, Control Precision can reveal hands so efficiently, that an alert and astute bidder or defender will be able to exploit it profitably. A lot of this elimination does occur, and with some extraordinary results.

One polite lady once asked me how I always knew to lead my partner’s singleton or void. “I listen to the bidding.” I answered with a chuckle. Control Precision is a complex system. Its complexity is revealed in the complication of the game. However, once this complexity has been understood, it becomes quite simple to play. A little like E=MC squared, that once the intricacy has been revealed, the logic becomes quite simple and straightforward. After all, is it not all about beating your opponents, and getting the best results on the score sheet? Mix the mystique of bridge with that of Control Precision, and it reveals some unexpected results, that when combined with logic, will give you an astonishing insight into the game.

I strongly advise against deviating from the system, primarily because a process of elimination has placed into many of my bids. I will explain this elimination, and perhaps you will see these new concepts for yourself. By adding or subtracting a point, or by, say bidding with a 5 cards major, where you should not have, or by choosing 1 over 1NT opening, you disregard these eliminated bids and no doubt this will cause you problems when you have a special type of hand to show. If you follow my set of rules, and get your partner to do the same, then I will present you with an entire outline for Control Bidding. I also hope to standardise Precision, so that any 2 players coming together, and have read this book, know exactly what they are playing. I have therefore called this method of playing Precision, Control Precision.

Control Precision has absolutely nothing to do with how many card controls one has. It is about who controls the bidding. I have written this book so that any good approach based player can learn to play Precision well, and can progress into it slowly. However for those of you who already play Precision, you will find a lot of good ideas here, especially with Control Bidding. New ideas have also been introduced, with new overcalls and Slam convention.

Precision was originally designed by CC Wei and used by the “Chinese” national team, so successfully for many years. The Americans, Italians and others also adopted it successfully from time to time. I have modified and enhanced it to allow for more bids. CC Wei had a very limited 2 opening, so we modified it to the Multi 2 in order to fit it into the whole system. We have also modified the 1 openings to make it more efficient. This has allowed us to change the other 2 level openings such as 2, 2 and 2NT giving us more options and chances to open the bidding first, with weak distributional hands.

I have set out this system in the way that I like to teach Precision. I will first show you how to bid the weak hands, and how it may, or may not, differ from the system you may currently be using. I assume the reader has had very little experience with a strong club system, and so I deal with the weaker hands first. After understanding all these weak bids, we may then proceed to learn how to bid the strong 1 Opening. Everything inside this complex labyrinth is new and different as well as the bidding style. This is because control reverts to the opener when strong, and so our bidding structure has to change.

I have also integrated a set of overcall bids that fit into the Control Bidding system too. So now you are not only playing Precision when you open the bidding but when you overcall too. Many of these overcalls may be very different to what you are used to, but use them with an open mind. Sometimes bidding will not be as familiar as your older methods. More often than not these bids will give you more control over the table, more accurate contracts, and great saves and sacrifices, as well as great leads and defence plays. There is much more to the game of bridge than just the bidding, so I will show you how to integrate this bidding system into your leads and signals too.
I prefer to defend using Roman Attitude Leads and Signals. That shows partner from the lead, the attitude and line the defence should take. I should remind you that Control Bidder also becomes Control Defender as soon as you start to defend. This is because he has the best view of both your cards, and usually has a very complete picture of declarer’s hand. He therefore uses these attitude signals to guide the Blind Bidder.

Those of you already playing Precision will already know that CC Wei taught us the value of knowing the combined High Card Point count of both hands early. In Precision we only count High Card Points (referred from now on as Hcp) and not distributional points. Distribution is bid separately and is only combined by the Control Bidder when a final decision is to be made. When you open the bidding, your partner will quickly have a good idea of the Total Point Count (40) and will now be in a perfect position to place the contract.

We open the bidding, as often as we can, with only 5 or 6 Hcp’s when the hand is distributional and with 11/12 Hcp’s when it is not. Because we open light, we open more often, to our best advantage. We also limit the opening bids to a restricted 15Hcp’s (we open 1 with 16+). There has to be no allowance for any strong 19 point hand when making a 1 or 1 opening bid. Partner can pass safely when quite weak. We bid our points and distribution separately so there is no need to adjust for distributional points. Opener may jump bid with as little 14 or 15 Hcp’s and even these bids are limited bids, while still imparting with the critical marginal information.

Control Precision goes one step further. I will show you when you are in control of the bidding and when control passes over to your partner. If both partners know who is in control, the right partner will make the right decisions at the right time. You will not be left with your partner making overbids in front of you, while you knew exactly what to do. If partner knows that you are in control, then he must leave those vital final decisions to you, and when you not in control, leave them to him.

I have placed hands into an auction situation in order to show you how to use the additional bids you will need, when the opponents interfere with your bidding, as they usually will. These tables do not need to be learned, except the asking bids maybe,and they are there for reference only.
Bridge is still a competitive game and your opponents will still be trying to outbid you.

Finally I will set out an outline on how to bid those awkward 4441(any order) hands, that out system seems to have so much difficulty in dealing with.

The entire system is based on the idea that both partners do not have to know exactly what is going on. We always have a Control Partner and a Blind Partner. The Blind Bidder describes exactly what he holds, while the Control Bidder guides him safely through the bidding, by letting him know if it is Safe To Bid or Unsafe To Bid or even if he wants to explore slam with an Omega Bid. Control Partner knows when to stop and relays that information to the Blind Partner without the need to describe his hand. Rather than relay information to one another, you simply describe what you have to the Control Partner, who places that information received against his own cards (which he can see) and makes a final and accurate decision. When the final contract is known bid directly to it, as soon as possible. Use the principle of fast arrival as soon as you have decided on the final contract. If an overbid or a double is required, the Control Bidder will know exactly what to do.
If there is any extra information that you need to relay, I will show you how to do this. This can be done, no matter whether you open the bidding or overcall, and even goes on into the play, where you will have a Control defender and a Blind defender.

Many of you will be familiar with these methods, just not realising you are already using them. For example when you open 1NT in an approach system you have described a balanced hand with 15-17 Hcp with no 5-card major, no singletons and not more than one doubleton. You are the Blind Bidder and your partner, armed with this information, takes control of the bidding. He may use Staymen or a transfer or invites a game or places a game. From your first opening bid he knows what he is going to do. He will choose the best method of finding out more information (Staymen has nothing to do with clubs and is forcing for one round) and ultimately Control Bidder decides where the contract will finally be placed. We do the same in Control Precision, but for other openings and overcalls, and not only for our NT openings.

Use Control Precision effectively, bid accurately and soon you will find that you always have a perfect picture of your partner’s hand, or he will have a perfect picture of yours. Either way, you and your partner will now be able to accurately place contracts. You will know when to retreat from the bidding and defend for good scores, and when to bid on. You will even be able to lead and defend better.

This system follows a simple and straightforward logic. Its exceptions are rare, but necessary, in order to describe certain unbiddable hands. As is in all conventions, many pages have to be written on rare exceptions, while the run of the mill hands, which come up so often gets less mention, as they are so much more straightforward.

Every hand has its opening bid and its follow up bid. I can assure you that every combination of distribution and points has been placed into an opening bid category, and your job is to find it. There are no unbiddable combinations. Each hand has only one opening, and I do not advice making or choosing an alternative bid, or creating new bids while playing. There are never two bids for any combination so find the correct one with your first bid. I will show you how to identify your hand. Your first bid limits your hand, while the second bid reveals the exact holding. The major task you have, when you open and count your cards and points, is to identify exactly which Opening Bid these cards belong to. Identify this accurately, if you don’t, your partner will not get the picture of your cards that he expects, and you will find no escape from your sequence and are sure to land up in the wrong contracts doubled.

I expect the reader to have a full understanding of Bridge scoring methods, to understand Vulnerability and the values of a save and one down bridge. I also expect the reader to fully understand the nature of the tournament he is playing in, whether it is Match Point Bridge, Imp, Rubber, Board a match, or Total points etc. Many good books have been written on these subjects, and so I will not go into that, any further.

Bridge is a competitive game. It is not a perfect science. Your bidding is only as good as your ability to play and defend the hand. This system is designed to help improve your bidding, but there is no point in bidding incredibly well if you cannot play out your contract. I also wish to point out that no system can tell you what cards your opponents are holding and how to deal with bad breaks. Ultimately you still have to rely on your skills to deal with these bad breaks as you would in any form of bridge.

Try Control Bidding using Precision and I can assure you more bidding accuracy. I promise you will be bidding and making more slams, since we have outstanding methods to reach the good slams, especially with minors. If you bid all your contracts accurately, play and defend well, I am sure your bridge results will improve rapidly.

B-)
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#2 User is offline   straube 

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Posted 2017-September-10, 09:56

You need to get over yourself.
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#3 User is offline   Bermy 

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Posted 2017-September-10, 16:55

View Poststraube, on 2017-September-10, 09:56, said:

You need to get over yourself.

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#4 User is offline   smerriman 

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Posted 2017-September-10, 17:47

If it wasn't already obvious before, Barmy is now well past troll territory.
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#5 User is offline   LBengtsson 

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Posted 2017-September-10, 22:19

det är skönare lyss till den sträng som brast än att aldrig spänna en båge.
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#6 User is offline   Bermy 

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Posted 2017-September-11, 01:13

View Postsmerriman, on 2017-September-10, 17:47, said:

If it wasn't already obvious before, Barmy is now well past troll territory.

Thanks, but as I have said before, if you are not interested in what I have to say, stay off this feed please. There are other feeds for you wize guy comments. I suggest you try the beginners feed, or the one on BBO manners
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#7 User is offline   Bermy 

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Posted 2017-September-11, 01:16

View PostLBengtsson, on 2017-September-10, 22:19, said:

det är skönare lyss till den sträng som brast än att aldrig spänna en båge.

It is more beautiful than light as hard as never to tear an arc google translate
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#8 User is offline   Zelandakh 

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Posted 2017-September-11, 06:53

Have you considered incorporating a more extensive 2 opening into your methods such as the Lee 2? It strikes me that the two would be a perfect fit for each other, a case of two South African ideas coming together in harmony. :ph34r:
(-: Zel :-)
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#9 User is offline   Bermy 

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Posted 2017-September-11, 08:54

View PostZelandakh, on 2017-September-11, 06:53, said:

Have you considered incorporating a more extensive 2 opening into your methods such as the Lee 2? It strikes me that the two would be a perfect fit for each other, a case of two South African ideas coming together in harmony. :ph34r:

No I am not open to new ideas (I will read your references nevertheless) as my system is complete, new ideas complicate things, and I have many new ideas myself. I cant work in contradiction, as this is a language. If any 2 partners want to play any new idea, talk about read about it and incorporate it if you like. However my system must come as a package, as it too is a language and is based on the universal language of Wei., Control Precision, if you are reading all this is a method of talking this language,to improve methods of bidding in Precision,and therefore it has its own style.
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#10 User is offline   Bermy 

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Posted 2017-September-11, 09:21

Adding to the last comment, having now read the reference, yes. There is nothing new about the multi 2 and I have taught and played among South Africans for years, and I read very little revealing either. My version is adapted to CP and I will publish my version soon, and if you find it similar, perhaps that is not even a co-incidence.

I have a lovely version for 2/1 too, but that does not belong in this feed. B-)
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#11 User is offline   Bermy 

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Posted 2017-September-12, 00:00

How to Learn Control Precision


If you are not familiar with Precision, I suggest you begin by first learning the Opening Bids. Control Precision is similar to Chinese Precision, but with the introduction of the Multi 2 (which works with 2/1 and SAYC too).
Asking Bids and Steps after 1Club is unnecessary to those unfamiliar with Precision. You may want to bid naturally with five card suits after 1 openings, as this works with Control Bidding too. I also recommend that you avoid using Omega Bids too soon.
Once already familiar with Precision and Control Bidding, proceed to play the whole of Control Precision. The Steps are not hard to learn and always go up in direction. I do not recommend deviating from this written version, since once learn it, you will be able to play it with others online or at your club.
Control Precision Plus is for those more advanced and more familiar with Control Bidding, and wish to take the whole concept further with more options for both the Control Bidder and Blind Bidder.
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#12 User is offline   Bermy 

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Posted 2017-September-12, 11:47

Safe to Bid if max.

Control Bidder must indicate at the earliest possible time, just how safe it is for Blind Bidder to bid. Safe to Bid asks the Blind Bidder to pass with a minimum hand, even in competition. It asks Blind Bidder to bid; only when holding the maximum, therefore no jump shift is needed. This does not instruct the Blind Bidder to keep bidding competitively, beyond the limits of the partnership. It is unwise for Blind Bidder to compete at the three level without a Void Licence.
A Balancing double is permitted by the blind partner when the bidding has not exceeded 2♠
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#13 User is offline   Bermy 

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Posted 2017-September-12, 12:41

Very Safe to Bid

Control Bidder must indicate at the earliest possible time, just how safe it is for Blind Bidder to bid. Very Safe to Bid forces Blind Bidder to bid even with a minimum hand and requests a jump bid with a maximum hand. This is not a game force, but rather a way to explore the possibility of game. Blind Bidder can compete at the three level without a Void Licence. Often, the Control Bidder will have more than one Safe to Bid available, so this bid allows Control Bidder to explore game with a stronger hand. In Competitive Bidding “Very Safe to Bid” is indicated with a cue bid or a very strong free bid.
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#14 User is offline   Bermy 

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Posted 2017-September-12, 12:46

Unsafe to Bid
Control Bidder must indicate at the earliest possible time, just how unsafe it is for Blind Bidder to bid. He instructs the blind bidder to pass, unless he has something special. Blind Bidder should trust this instruction and not re-enter the bidding unless he is a max hand with extra values. In Competitive Bidding, “Unsafe to Bid” is usually a pass.
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#15 User is offline   Bermy 

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Posted 2017-September-12, 23:40

Control Bidding requires absolute accuracy when opening blind. In Control Precision we reveal High Card Points only when opening. Distributional points are not counted, but rather shape is revealed. This way Control Bidder can be very accurate on how strong the combined values are, and by deducting the combined points from 40, so to read the relative strengths of both sides cards. Control Bidder does not have the same obligation to be as accurate, but should rather control the safety of the bidding.
When playing Control Precision Plus more flexibility can be given to the Blind Bidder. The Blind Bidder may shift the borders by a point in order to upgrade or downgrade the hand.
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#16 User is offline   Bermy 

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Posted 2017-September-12, 23:44

One Round Force by Control Bidder means it is Safe to Bid once more. Blind Bidder cannot pass, therefore bids once to show shape with minimum hand. He may jump bid with a maximum hand, but since this is only a one round force, it is NOT a game force as in Omega Bids.

An example of this is to compare our 2 over 1 bids to those of other systems.
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#17 User is offline   Bermy 

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Posted 2017-September-13, 18:24

Control is the ultimate decision as to where the final contract is going to be played. This is the decision that is made by the Control Bidder, and not the Blind Bidder. Both partners know who will be making this decision and know as to whether to compete in the bidding or not. The general rule of thumb is to push the bidding to the three level without pulling it from the three level. The Control Bidder is in the best position to make these decisions. Whether to compete for a part score, or push to game or even overbid to the 5 level.
Control Bidder should be aware of the vulnerability situation of both parties, the scores and the situation of play. All decisions must be made with the full knowledge of how bridge scoring works.
The Penalty Double now also becomes the decision of the Control Bidder. That is saying that when Control Bidder doubles for penalties, this is forcing and must be respected by partner. However if Blind Partner makes a penalty double, this is not forcing, but merely shows strong holding in the opposition’s trump suit. This penalty double can be pulled out by Control Bidder, primarily because he is still the partner in Control of the bidding.
The Blind Bidder may only make an overbid, if he is holding a very special hand, containing either a void or 2x singletons. This qualifies for the Blind Licence, or Blind Mad Bid.
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#18 User is offline   Bermy 

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Posted 2017-September-13, 19:07

Five Categories of Defining your Hand
All hands will fall into one of five categories. It is the opener’s task to quickly define which category the hand belongs to.

1) Balanced Hands.
2) 5 card majors or longer
3) Long minors
4) Distributional
5) 4441

1) No Trump Balanced hand type. A No Trump Balanced Hand can be described as a hand limited by No singleton, No Void, No five card major, and no six card minor. I strongly advise against opening No Trump with a balanced five card major, as it is misleading. By bidding the No Trump shape and its High Card Points your partner will have no difficulty in using conventions such as Staymen, Major Suit Transfers and Minor Suit Transfers. You limit your hand by which No Trump sequence you use. After your partner gives you the appropriate relay bid (such as Staymen or a transfer) you describe your holding. Most bridge players will be familiar with these methods, and use them in all current systems already. By transferring to your partner’s suite you give the Control Bidder the option to pass, place the contract, invite to game or even cue bid to ask for more information. He may now wish to know how well the partnership controls certain dangerous side suites by asking for stoppers. Third suit asks for stopper in forth suit, and forth suit asks for stopper in that suit.


Please take note that Control Precision + does stray from this exact table and should be read separately.


How to open Balanced Hands.

0-10 Hcp Pass.
11-12 Hcp Open 1
then rebid 1NT
13-15 Hcp Open 1NT
16-18 Hcp Open 1 then rebid 1NT (or nearest NT available)
19-21 Hcp Open 1 then rebid 2NT (or jump bid NT)
22-24 Hcp Open 2
then rebid the nearest NT
25+ Open 1 then rebid the highest NT (3 or 4 depending on partner’s response to 1)

Note that within the 11-12 High Card Point range that you open 1
then rebid 1NT after checking for 4-card majors up the line. You have dispatched enough information already. The level of the auction will be decided by your partner, the Control Bidder, by the time you reach 1NT. Because you bid 4-card majors up the line there is therefore no need to use Staymen or transfers.

For Balanced Hands of a value of 13 or more High Card Points, proceed with Staymen , major suit transfers and minor suit Break of Transfer. The obvious advantage of using transfers is to give complete control to the weaker hand, as well allowing the stronger hand to receive the lead, and become declarer. In some instances, the weaker hand becomes declarer, especially during the multi 2
sequence, even so, we transfer anyway, for the sake of retaining control with the weaker hand and for bidding consistency.

Now by eliminating these Balanced Hands from all our other opening bids, we have limited all our hands to those types of hands that have solid suite potential. Note, that if the bidding sequence does not show a No Trump type of hand, that option must be eliminated from the cards expected. The expected cards may now show short or long suites.


2) Five Card Majors or Longer. This is defined as all opening hands that have five or more cards in at least one of the major suits. We open one of the major whenever we have 11-15 High Card Points. The opener declares early that he has a good major to attack the bidding with, as well as a limited High Card Point range. The responder (Control Bidder) now only needs to know what that distribution really is. The following bid or bids will give this required information. Let us say, Opener bids 1 then rebids 2, the responder already knows the location of nine of his partner’s thirteen cards as well as the limited point range, within two points. The four remaining critical cards will not be difficult to determine, even when defending. When the Control Bidder has slam potential, he may use the 2No Trump Omega Bid (The Major General) to initiate advanced asking bids in order to determine the exact shape of those unknown cards.

How to bid 5-card majors

0 -10 Hcp Pass
11-13 Hcp Open the major and either rebid cautiously or pass, depending on the quality of partner’s response. You may rebid your 5-Card major at the 2 levels to show weakness and no second suite to add. 1NT is acceptable, when available.
13-15 Hcp Open the major, rebid with an aggressive bid. A jump shift will show strength. Therefore, say in the sequence 1-1NT-2, opener has reverse bid unnecessarily to show this stronger type of holding. The two no trump bid now becomes available when holding a five card major, and no other rebid.
16+ Hcp Open 1 Now, you have control of the bidding.



3) Long Minors Five or more of a minor with a short suit (singleton). Once again, the sooner that the Control Partner can be informed of the exact information, and be better equipped to evaluate the combined holding. Control Bidder has the responsibility to decide on the best option. Whether to play in No Trumps (always preferred to five level minor) or in the suite, knowing what level the contract should be played. All possibilities can be investigated, especially when the combined holdings are strong. With good Control Bidding we will be able to quickly research any slam probabilities or possibilities, hopefully before the bidding exceeds Three No Trumps. We need to prevent playing in five of a minor, when Three No Trumps is a better option, so this has to be decided early.


Opening Bids for Long Minors.

We have reserved two of our available opening bids for weaker hands with long minors and No Trumps for Balanced Hands. That is the 1• and the 2 Opening. When you hold five times minor with a balanced hand, you should ignore these instructions, and return to the paragraphs about No Trump hands. Opener is more limited, allowing the Control Bidder a more accurate picture, by eliminating that option.

11-12 Hcp 5332 Open 1
and rebid 1NT
11-12 Hcp 5x with 4x Major. Open 1
and support major or bid upward to 1NT. 2
is optional
11-12 Hcp 5x with 4x Open 1 and rebid 2 or support raise.
11-12 Hcp 6x or more Open 1 and rebid 2

11-12 Hcp 4xand 5x Open 1 and rebid 2
11-12 Hcp 5x and 4x major Open 2 and rebid the major
11-12 Hcp 6x Open 2 and rebid the
13-15 Hcp 5 x and 4x major Open 1 and jump support or reverse bid
13-15 Hcp 5x and 4x Open 1 No Trump if Balanced
Open 1 and jump to 3 if with singleton
13-15 Hcp 6x or more Open 1 and rebid 2No Trumps
Open 1 and rebid 3 with singleton
13-15 Hcp 4xand 5x Open 1 and rebid 3
13-15 Hcp 5x and 4x major Open 2 and jump rebid the major
13-15 Hcp 6x or more Open 2 and rebid NT
14-15 Hcp 5 and 5 Open 2 and rebid 3
16+ Hcp Open 1 You will now have Control of the Bidding



4 Distributional Hands. All those weak hands that are low in points but have their value because of one or two long suits. They also have value with short suits. We use these hands to inflict maximum damage into the opponents bidding. By taking control of the bidding early, we enhance our ability to find a suitable contract for ourselves, at the best possible level. We bid pre-empts, as high as possible, but we also want partner, the Control Bidder, to have accurate information on our own holding, to best evaluate our prospects.

Opening the Bidding with Distributional Hands.

Like all good systems we have reserved all our higher openings to weak distributional hands. All our opening bids from the 2 (Multi) upwards are reserved for these types of hands.

0-6 Hcp Pass. Wait a little first, to find out if partner has values to enter the bidding, and you may have the opportunity to take control. If you partner has already limited the bidding by passing, you may be a little bolder depending on Vulnerability of course. Take these kinds of risks only when the opportunity is extremely favourable

7-10 + 6 Card Major Open using the specially prepared Multi 2• then rebid major

7-10 + 2x 5 Card suites Open with the Highest Ranking Major. Control Bidder may want to use relay bids to determine the lower ranking suit

5-10 + 6 Card Minor Open 4 of the minor. This should be used with care and with favourable Vulnerability. It is an especially useful bid NV with a passed partner, as it immediately eliminates the opponent’s option of bidding 3NT.

5-10 + 7 Card Suite Open 3 level pre-empt

5-10 + 8 Cards Suite Open 4 or 5 level pre-empt

Gambling 3 No Trump The 3 No Trump opening is available so why not use it for this special type of hand



5) 4-4-4-1 Hands. This rare type of holding can be very difficult to bid. You may have noticed that this type of distributions fall into none of the above categories, and therefore require special detailed attention. We may have some difficulty bidding these hands. But they do occur, so we have to spend some time and effort on dealing with them.

To Bid these hands, we have reserved certain sequences, and created our own conventions. One must be wary of how this is used, as we do not wish to overbid any hand that is already high enough in the bidding. However, if the Control Bidder knows, 1) The exact Hcp range and 2) The exact location of the singleton, then placing the final contract can be made to be quite easy.

Bidding 4-4-4-1 Hands.
For strong 16+ 4441 holdings, we prefer the multi 2 to the strong 1. For the weaker 11-15 Hcp hands we open 1 regardless of whether the singleton is a diamond or not.. Consider this, if partner opened 1 and then jump shifts either into your four card major or another major, it will inform you of an outside singleton. You must consider why partner chose not to open 1NT with 13-15 Hcp, is it because of that singleton? Yes and where might the singleton be? The process of elimination will almost always tell you, however there are relay bids available to you, if you need to find out more.

We can describe exactly where the singleton lies. This is done by bidding one step below the singleton at the next level, and is known as Bobs Rule. Control Bidder will see partner’s hand, and know the exact point range and the exact location of the key singleton. Control Bidder can now place the final contract perfectly. Because 16+ 4441 hands open 2 ,all the three and four level bids are now available for us to use.


Now that I have outlined these five categories, let us see how we open the bidding in Precision, and how Control Precision may differ from other forms of Precision. Open and sort out your cards, or even if a computer sorts them for you, decide to which category this hand belongs, add up your High Card Points. Every hand has its category and point range. We are now opening the bidding as early and as often as possible and with as little as 7 high card points, so if you qualify, proceed to bid. Remember control is everything.
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#19 User is offline   Zelandakh 

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Posted 2017-September-14, 00:04

Just to be sure that I have understood correctly, a 2533 13 count opposite a 4144 6-7 count would have the auction 1 - 1; 2NT - P, right? I have to admit that some of your bidding ideas have truly amazed me even as someone who takes a big interest in unusual systems - your rebids even remind me a little of Cohen's LIO system, which I certainly did not expect. Just one tip if you will take it - it might be better to post the system concisely rather than interspersing it with lots of flowery language about how wonderful it is. We can surely infer that from constructing the potential auctions (as above) and it tends to make the system itself more difficult to follow. A FD document might also save you a lot of time and be an excellent resource for any pairs wanting to take advantage of your work.
(-: Zel :-)
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#20 User is offline   Bermy 

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Posted 2017-September-14, 05:41

[message deleted

Point noted :)
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