BBO Discussion Forums: Few from tonight - II - BBO Discussion Forums

Jump to content

  • 3 Pages +
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • You cannot start a new topic
  • You cannot reply to this topic

Few from tonight - II

#41 User is offline   MrAce 

  • VIP Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • Group: Advanced Members
  • Posts: 4,380
  • Joined: 2009-November-14
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Houston, TX

Posted 2012-May-11, 13:32

View PostPhil, on 2012-May-11, 13:26, said:

Ergo simply means "therefore".


I know, but this doesnt help me to understand the problem of using it in forums. If it simply means "therefore" why is it considered (Han didn't say that but thats what i thought) annoying ?
"Genius has its own limitations, however stupidity is boundless"
"Gosh given your bbf manner would love to see your teaching LOL if i was a novice i'd be running a million miles from you" - Eagles123
Disclaimer: this post is not intended to offend anyone who spews constant drivel. --PhilKing





0

#42 User is offline   AlexJonson 

  • PipPipPipPip
  • Group: Full Members
  • Posts: 496
  • Joined: 2010-November-03

Posted 2012-May-11, 14:20

For many speakers ergo is easier to spell than therefore.
1

#43 User is offline   fuburules3 

  • PipPipPipPip
  • Group: Full Members
  • Posts: 224
  • Joined: 2010-April-12
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:New York

Posted 2012-May-11, 15:08

View PostMrAce, on 2012-May-11, 13:32, said:

I know, but this doesnt help me to understand the problem of using it in forums. If it simply means "therefore" why is it considered (Han didn't say that but thats what i thought) annoying ?


I think it can be considered pretentious. Using a "fancy" word when a "simple" one would suffice annoys some people. Ergo doesn't really bother me personally.
1

#44 User is offline   gnasher 

  • Andy Bowles
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • Group: Advanced Members
  • Posts: 11,506
  • Joined: 2007-May-03
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:London, UK

Posted 2012-May-12, 04:21

There's nothing wrong per se with using Latin words instead of bona fide English words, but gratuitous use of such words can be distracting, so ceteris paribus it's preferable to use vernacular English. This was recommended by, inter alia, Fowler.

PS: Personally I prefer "hence".
If future responses could be on topic, i.e. comparing the two suggested systems, rather than some alternative nutjob method, that'd be appreciated, thanks. - MickyB
1

#45 User is offline   gnasher 

  • Andy Bowles
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • Group: Advanced Members
  • Posts: 11,506
  • Joined: 2007-May-03
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:London, UK

Posted 2012-May-13, 05:33

View Postgnasher, on 2012-May-12, 04:21, said:

This was recommended by, inter alia, Fowler.

If nobody else is going to nickpick this, I suppose I'd better do it myself. As I'm talking about people rather than things, it should, of course, be inter alii.
If future responses could be on topic, i.e. comparing the two suggested systems, rather than some alternative nutjob method, that'd be appreciated, thanks. - MickyB
0

#46 User is offline   phil_20686 

  • Scotland
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • Group: Advanced Members
  • Posts: 2,562
  • Joined: 2008-August-22
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Scotland

Posted 2012-May-13, 09:42

View Postgnasher, on 2012-May-13, 05:33, said:

it should, of course, be inter alii.


And I thought I was pedantic.
The physics is theoretical, but the fun is real. - Sheldon Cooper
0

#47 User is offline   the hog 

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • Group: Advanced Members
  • Posts: 10,241
  • Joined: 2003-March-07
  • Location:Laos
  • Interests:Wagner and Bridge

Posted 2012-May-13, 17:53

"Ergo" is prefectly acceptable as a synonym for "therefore". It is certainly not pretentious.
"The King of Hearts a broadsword bears, the Queen of Hearts a rose." W. H. Auden.
0

#48 User is offline   hatchett 

  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • Group: Full Members
  • Posts: 589
  • Joined: 2005-November-02
  • Location:Moldova

Posted 2012-May-14, 02:05

View Postgnasher, on 2012-May-13, 05:33, said:

If nobody else is going to nickpick this, I suppose I'd better do it myself. As I'm talking about people rather than things, it should, of course, be inter alii.


Does this count as nitpicking?
1

#49 User is offline   han 

  • Under bidder
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • Group: Advanced Members
  • Posts: 11,793
  • Joined: 2004-July-25
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Amsterdam, the Netherlands

Posted 2012-May-14, 05:16

I don't think that there is anything wrong with ergo, it can be perfect in the right circumstances.

If you are making the case for a new groundbreaking theory that could change the history of mankind, you haven't let the conclusion out of the box yet, you let the pressure and suspense build up and up until suddenly, after your final logical step, you conclude after a moment's pause that...... "ERGO, THE WEAK NOTRUMP PLAYED BY AN EXPERT PARTNERSHIP IS CONSIDERABLY BETTER THAN A STRONG NOTRUMP!", that would be a good occasion for the word.

I think that thus or therefore wouldn't quite do it, but hence would work just as well.
Please note: I am interested in boring, bog standard, 2/1.

- hrothgar
0

#50 User is offline   y66 

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • Group: Advanced Members
  • Posts: 2,584
  • Joined: 2006-February-24

Posted 2012-May-14, 07:18

View Postgnasher, on 2012-May-13, 05:33, said:

If nobody else is going to nickpick this, I suppose I'd better do it myself. As I'm talking about people rather than things, it should, of course, be inter alios.

fyp
"If you lose all hope, you can always find it again." ― Richard Ford, The Sportswriter
1

#51 User is offline   MrAce 

  • VIP Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • Group: Advanced Members
  • Posts: 4,380
  • Joined: 2009-November-14
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Houston, TX

Posted 2012-May-14, 12:43

View Posthan, on 2012-May-14, 05:16, said:

I don't think that there is anything wrong with ergo, it can be perfect in the right circumstances.

If you are making the case for a new groundbreaking theory that could change the history of mankind, you haven't let the conclusion out of the box yet, you let the pressure and suspense build up and up until suddenly, after your final logical step, you conclude after a moment's pause that...... "ERGO, THE WEAK NOTRUMP PLAYED BY AN EXPERT PARTNERSHIP IS CONSIDERABLY BETTER THAN A STRONG NOTRUMP!", that would be a good occasion for the word.

I think that thus or therefore wouldn't quite do it, but hence would work just as well.


Ok, now i understood it much better. Thank you.
"Genius has its own limitations, however stupidity is boundless"
"Gosh given your bbf manner would love to see your teaching LOL if i was a novice i'd be running a million miles from you" - Eagles123
Disclaimer: this post is not intended to offend anyone who spews constant drivel. --PhilKing





0

#52 User is offline   rmnka447 

  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • Group: Full Members
  • Posts: 651
  • Joined: 2012-March-18
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Illinois
  • Interests:Bridge, Golf, Soccer

Posted 2012-May-14, 18:57

Probably, "For example" would have been better. Yes, I a native born American.
0

#53 User is offline   Statto 

  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • Group: Full Members
  • Posts: 636
  • Joined: 2011-December-01
  • Gender:Not Telling
  • Location:UK
  • Interests:Bridge, Poker, but not in conflation.
    Statistics, but not massaged by the media.

Posted 2012-May-15, 17:54

View PostPhil, on 2012-May-11, 13:26, said:

Ergo simply means "therefore".

That's what my Italian->English dictionary translates it as B-)
A perfection of means, and confusion of aims, seems to be our main problem – Albert Einstein
0

Share this topic:


  • 3 Pages +
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • You cannot start a new topic
  • You cannot reply to this topic

1 User(s) are reading this topic
0 members, 1 guests, 0 anonymous users