BBO Discussion Forums: pet peeve thread - BBO Discussion Forums

Jump to content

  • 46 Pages +
  • « First
  • 11
  • 12
  • 13
  • 14
  • 15
  • Last »
  • You cannot start a new topic
  • You cannot reply to this topic

pet peeve thread

#241 User is offline   ggwhiz 

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • Group: Advanced Members
  • Posts: 2,756
  • Joined: 2008-June-23
  • Gender:Male

Posted 2012-May-10, 10:44

View PostVampyr, on 2012-May-10, 08:49, said:

I have been getting a lot of spam texts lately, and this has me peeved.


I just got hacked for the 2nd time in a year and spammed my whole contact list. That should be a capital crime.
The race may not go to the swift nor the battle to the strong. But that's the way to bet it.
0

#242 User is offline   mikeh 

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • Group: Advanced Members
  • Posts: 9,203
  • Joined: 2005-June-15
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Canada
  • Interests:Bridge, golf, wine (red), cooking, reading eclectically but insatiably, travelling, making bad posts.

Posted 2012-May-10, 11:32

View PostPassedOut, on 2012-May-08, 16:35, said:

In the same vein, people interchanging "insure" and "ensure." I find split infinitives grating also, but am getting more tolerant with age.

I can assure you that I always try to ensure that my house will not burn down, but I insure it in case it does.

I try to play bridge well, not good. Good is what I like to try to do: well, is how I try to do it.

As for split infinitives, I try to completely ignore the issue, but, when the question is one of a dangling participle, that is something up with which I will not put.
'one of the great markers of the advance of human kindness is the howls you will hear from the Men of God' Johann Hari
0

#243 User is offline   mgoetze 

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • Group: Advanced Members
  • Posts: 3,595
  • Joined: 2005-January-28
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Cologne, Germany
  • Interests:Sleeping, Eating

Posted 2012-May-10, 13:16

View Postggwhiz, on 2012-May-10, 10:44, said:

I just got hacked for the 2nd time in a year and spammed my whole contact list. That should be a capital crime.

I agree that this is quite serious but I think you are being just a little bit too harsh on yourself, I hope you will reconsider.
"One of the painful things about our time is that those who feel certainty are stupid, and those with any imagination and understanding are filled with doubt and indecision"
    -- Bertrand Russell
1

#244 User is offline   y66 

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • Group: Advanced Members
  • Posts: 2,600
  • Joined: 2006-February-24

Posted 2012-May-10, 15:10

View Postggwhiz, on 2012-May-10, 10:44, said:

I just got hacked for the 2nd time in a year and spammed my whole contact list. That should be a capital crime.


This happened to me a number of years ago. I was using hotmail with a weak password. Very embarrassing to have all your friends get spammed for eternity. I switched to gmail and a strong password and have not had this problem since.

Edit: knock wood.
"If you lose all hope, you can always find it again." ― Richard Ford, The Sportswriter
0

#245 User is offline   mike777 

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • Group: Advanced Members
  • Posts: 15,069
  • Joined: 2003-October-07
  • Gender:Male

Posted 2012-May-10, 15:32

View Posty66, on 2012-May-10, 15:10, said:

This happened to me a number of years ago. I was using hotmail with a weak password. Very embarrassing to have all your friends get spammed for eternity. I switched to gmail and a strong password and have not had this problem since.

Edit: knock wood.



yes stronger password seems to help alot here.
0

#246 User is offline   Scarabin 

  • PipPipPipPip
  • Group: Full Members
  • Posts: 382
  • Joined: 2010-December-30
  • Gender:Male
  • Interests:All types of games especially bridge & war games.
    old bidding systems & computer simulation programming.

Posted 2012-May-10, 19:23

How about intellectual dishonesty as a pet peeve? When we make quotations surely we should credit the source? Or if we think the source is obvious, at least enclose the quote in inverted commas to show we are not plagiarising?
0

#247 User is offline   Foxx 

  • PipPipPipPip
  • Group: Full Members
  • Posts: 338
  • Joined: 2003-February-15
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:La Jolla, California
  • Interests:Being quick, brown, and foxy; Jumping over lazy dogs

Posted 2012-May-15, 18:05

"Sign Up or Log in to see what your friends are doing."

I don't get it. If they're really your friends, why can't you just ask them? Isn't that what a friend is?
0

#248 User is offline   Antrax 

  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • Group: Advanced Members
  • Posts: 2,285
  • Joined: 2011-March-15
  • Gender:Male

Posted 2012-May-15, 21:16

You can ask them, but then you'll hear what they're doing, not see it.
0

#249 User is offline   mycroft 

  • Secretary Bird
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • Group: Advanced Members
  • Posts: 3,817
  • Joined: 2003-July-12
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Calgary, Canada

Posted 2012-May-16, 11:05

"sign up or log in to see what your friends are doing." In other words:

"sign up or log in to broadcast your ideas to the world at large, especially our advertisers that are buying your activity from us."

Legitimately, log in to let your friends see what you're doing makes sense. But usually, when someone tells this introvert that they care about "my friends", who they really care about is "their friends."
0

#250 User is offline   Fluffy 

  • World Master without a clue
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • Group: Advanced Members
  • Posts: 16,174
  • Joined: 2003-November-13
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:madrid

Posted 2012-May-30, 06:15

The damned misstranslation of "remove" makes me crazy. In Spannish "remover" means to move repeatedly, used mainly on context where "stir" is used in english. It has nothing to do with "remove", yet I see it misstranslated everywhere. Device's manuals, tv programs, even on newspapers.

How does it sound to you?

remove the mixture until it gets homogeneous
stir the safety band form the top


Another one comes from "actually", misstranslated to "actualmente" wich means right now.
0

#251 User is offline   gordontd 

  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • Group: Advanced Members
  • Posts: 2,490
  • Joined: 2009-July-14
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:London

Posted 2012-May-30, 06:20

View PostFluffy, on 2012-May-30, 06:15, said:

Another one comes from "actually", misstranslated to "actualmente" wich means right now.

We have the word "momentarily" which in British English means "for a moment" but in US English means "in a moment".
Gordon Rainsford
London UK
0

#252 User is offline   Fluffy 

  • World Master without a clue
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • Group: Advanced Members
  • Posts: 16,174
  • Joined: 2003-November-13
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:madrid

Posted 2012-May-30, 06:34

A spannish person would have a tough time understanding the US word, the british looks so obvious to us.
0

#253 User is offline   phil_20686 

  • Scotland
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • Group: Advanced Members
  • Posts: 2,564
  • Joined: 2008-August-22
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Scotland

Posted 2012-May-30, 07:02

View Postmgoetze, on 2012-May-08, 14:44, said:

People interchanging "affect" and "effect" at random e.g.


I have effected* a poor affect**.

Posted Image

*Although normally affect is the verb and effect is the noun, effect is also a verb which means to "bring about" or accomplish.

**Similarly affect as a noun means approximately the same as mood, or humour".
The physics is theoretical, but the fun is real. - Sheldon Cooper
1

#254 User is offline   Cyberyeti 

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • Group: Advanced Members
  • Posts: 6,178
  • Joined: 2009-July-13
  • Location:England

Posted 2012-May-30, 07:30

View PostFluffy, on 2012-May-30, 06:15, said:

The damned misstranslation of "remove" makes me crazy. In Spannish "remover" means to move repeatedly, used mainly on context where "stir" is used in english. It has nothing to do with "remove", yet I see it misstranslated everywhere. Device's manuals, tv programs, even on newspapers.

How does it sound to you?

remove the mixture until it gets homogeneous
stir the safety band form the top


Another one comes from "actually", misstranslated to "actualmente" wich means right now.

Constipado is another old favourite (means you've got a cold).
0

#255 User is offline   Fluffy 

  • World Master without a clue
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • Group: Advanced Members
  • Posts: 16,174
  • Joined: 2003-November-13
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:madrid

Posted 2012-May-30, 08:05

what does constipado sound like in english?
0

#256 User is offline   mikeh 

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • Group: Advanced Members
  • Posts: 9,203
  • Joined: 2005-June-15
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Canada
  • Interests:Bridge, golf, wine (red), cooking, reading eclectically but insatiably, travelling, making bad posts.

Posted 2012-May-30, 11:48

View PostFluffy, on 2012-May-30, 08:05, said:

what does constipado sound like in english?

It sounds like an irregular verb*







*Most English speakers, told they suffer from constipado, will reach for a laxative to 'restore regularity'.
'one of the great markers of the advance of human kindness is the howls you will hear from the Men of God' Johann Hari
1

#257 User is offline   mgoetze 

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • Group: Advanced Members
  • Posts: 3,595
  • Joined: 2005-January-28
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Cologne, Germany
  • Interests:Sleeping, Eating

Posted 2012-May-30, 11:56

View PostPassedOut, on 2012-May-08, 16:35, said:

In the same vein, people interchanging "insure" and "ensure." I find split infinitives grating also, but am getting more tolerant with age.

Speaking of grating, people who write "greatful".
"One of the painful things about our time is that those who feel certainty are stupid, and those with any imagination and understanding are filled with doubt and indecision"
    -- Bertrand Russell
0

#258 User is offline   barmar 

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • Group: Admin
  • Posts: 11,918
  • Joined: 2004-August-21
  • Gender:Male

Posted 2012-May-30, 13:40

Heard on "Fresh Air" today. The AP Stylebook has eliminated its rule against using the word "hopefully" as a floating sentence adverb, as in "Hopefully, the Red Sox will win the World Series again some day."

http://www.npr.org/2...-stay-hopefully

#259 User is offline   Vampyr 

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • Group: Advanced Members
  • Posts: 5,839
  • Joined: 2009-September-15
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:London

Posted 2012-May-30, 19:31

Once my father told some Russian friends that he had prepared a meal that didn't contain "preservativni". They were pleased to know that their food had no condoms in it.

Words like these are called "false friends".
London, England
0

#260 User is offline   Vampyr 

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • Group: Advanced Members
  • Posts: 5,839
  • Joined: 2009-September-15
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:London

Posted 2012-May-30, 20:09

View Postmgoetze, on 2012-May-30, 11:56, said:

Speaking of grating, people who write "greatful".


and "loose" for "lose", "lead" for "led", "arguement" for "argument", any combination of letters for "definite"... I think that as English has become the linga franca for this forum and in many other contexts, those of use who are native or fluent speakers ought to have a little patience.
London, England
0

Share this topic:


  • 46 Pages +
  • « First
  • 11
  • 12
  • 13
  • 14
  • 15
  • Last »
  • You cannot start a new topic
  • You cannot reply to this topic

1 User(s) are reading this topic
0 members, 1 guests, 0 anonymous users