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The Rodwell Files

#21 User is offline   benlessard 

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Posted 2011-August-06, 14:18

View Postrogerclee, on 2011-August-06, 10:43, said:

Why are you reading the forums? Eric Rodwell just wrote 400 pages about cardplay.


Because Amazon isnt instant :)

1 "Breaking the Bridge Rules: First Hand Play"
Barry Rigal; Paperback; CDN$ 16.02

Sold by: Amazon.com.ca, Inc.
1 "Bridge Squeezes Complete: Winning Endgame Strategy (2nd edition)"
Clyde E. Love; Paperback; CDN$ 17.52

Sold by: Amazon.com.ca, Inc.
1 "Defensive Signaling at Bridge"
David Bird; Paperback; CDN$ 15.85

Sold by: Amazon.com.ca, Inc.
4 "Rodwell Files, The"
Eric Rodwell; Paperback; CDN$ 17.52

Quote

Incorrect, stiff ten is irrelevant. If you bang down the ace and the ten drops, you can force 3 tricks, and if you run the jack you will still lose to the K and Q and take 3 tricks.


I wasnt comparing running the J vs banging the A i was comparing running the J vs running the 9 (to win when its T----KQxx)

Thanks for the great Fred post. I agree with all of it. But im very surprised that he said that being a super pro vs being a pro at suit combination has giving him a better result on only 1 hand.
Wank comments on a ATB

"obviously north miscounted his cards and his points, whereas south only miscounted his cards"
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#22 User is offline   y66 

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Posted 2011-August-06, 15:05

View Postbenlessard, on 2011-August-06, 14:18, said:

Because Amazon isnt instant :)


I see that it's available on Kindle in 4 parts. I have no experience reading bridge books on Kindle.
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#23 User is offline   barmar 

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Posted 2011-August-06, 15:10

View Posty66, on 2011-August-06, 15:05, said:

I see that it's available on Kindle in 4 parts. I have no experience reading bridge books on Kindle.

Although the Kindle edition ends up being $5 more than the paperback's discounted price.

I recently got a Kindle. After seeing all the book signings that went on at the NABC (several other authors signed on different days), I got to wondering what will happen to these in the future, when most books will be sold electronically.

#24 User is offline   heyrocky 

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Posted 2011-August-06, 18:00

I have the full version on the Kindle, bought through the publisher a month ago. I had to convert the file the publisher made available to be able to load it on the Kindle, but turns out there's a program that does that easily enough, and it all costs less than what Amazon is charging for the four parts, if I recall.

I've gotten about a quarter of the way through it. I had hoped to start this thread with a review of the entire book, but there is so much to digest, and it turns out moving back to the US takes a great deal of time.

Reading bridge books on the Kindle isn't that different than a physical book, but if there's a hand being discussed that might have been on a facing page, you will have to page forward and backward to get the full effect.

#25 User is offline   JLOGIC 

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Posted 2011-August-07, 01:11

In case it isn't clear yet, the reason to run the jack from dummy is to pick up KQTx on your right. It loses to stiff Q or stiff K on your left when compared to cashing the acew, but this is less likely.
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#26 User is offline   Cascade 

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Posted 2011-August-07, 02:10

View Postbenlessard, on 2011-August-06, 14:18, said:

Because Amazon isnt instant :)


I bought and downloaded a near instant copy from www.ebooksbridge.com.

It is on my android and I am slowly working my way through it.
Wayne Burrows

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dunno how to play 4 card majors - JLOGIC
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#27 User is offline   benlessard 

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Posted 2011-August-07, 08:19

View PostJLOGIC, on 2011-August-07, 01:11, said:

In case it isn't clear yet, the reason to run the jack from dummy is to pick up KQTx on your right. It loses to stiff Q or stiff K on your left when compared to cashing the acew, but this is less likely.



Dummy J9876
to Ax

Running the jack is also to pick up Kx,Qx, in RHO. Running the J vs the 9 is to pick up a stiff T by west.

PS i think every time you lead an H from a long suit to a short honnor you should always play the highest even from a broken suit.

KT87x = T

KJ98x vs Ax =J (If you know RHO has 4 of them and 5 is likely)

QT98 = Q

etc.
Wank comments on a ATB

"obviously north miscounted his cards and his points, whereas south only miscounted his cards"
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#28 User is offline   mike777 

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Posted 2011-October-11, 10:46

The Rodwell Files. Eric Rodwell with Mark Horton.27.00$, 2011.400pp.
Level=Intermediate/Advanced
Grade=A


This book is 400 very dense pages of Cardplay. It is advertised as Int/adv but it is really for the true expert.
It starts out talking about squeezes and dummy reversals then it gets into the really hard stuff.
He uses concepts such as +L postiions, tightropes, trick packages and control units.


If nonexperts can retain even 10% of what is presented here you will see a great advancement in your cardplay. This is a book you will want to read and reread again and again. In the future Eric may wish to divide this book into several other books that just focus on a few of these items at one time.
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#29 User is offline   Gerben42 

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Posted 2011-October-12, 11:20

I bought it on my eReader and I paid $22 for all parts. I'm halfway through ... wow.
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#30 User is offline   jillybean 

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Posted 2011-October-12, 14:20

My partner lent me the book, he's not getting it back.
The first 2 chapters that MikeH skipped over are fabulous for mere mortals, I've already gone over content in chapter 2 several times. :)
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#31 User is offline   kenrexford 

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Posted 2011-October-12, 15:38

View PostJLOGIC, on 2011-August-07, 01:11, said:

In case it isn't clear yet, the reason to run the jack from dummy is to pick up KQTx on your right. It loses to stiff Q or stiff K on your left when compared to cashing the acew, but this is less likely.


These types of problems always intrigue me as to the psychology of the cards. If the situation is such that RHO knows what is going on, covering the Jack can be a net no-gain play. He might as well duck and lose the first trick, as the end is the same, all things being equal. For that matter, any card could randomly be played. Covering works as well as ducking, as well as sticking in the 10. Thus, in a sense, all four cards are equal.

With, however, Q10xxx or K10xxx, RHO is forced to play one of his three small cards. Hence, he has three equal options all involving ducking.

Thus, on a pure informational basis, one might argue that a pip from RHO will occur in one-fourth of all KQ10x scenarios. However, a pip will occur 100% of all K10xxx scenarios and Q10xxx scenarios. This, in theory, affects the odds tremendously.

Against that is that the person with KQ10x(x)(x) must actually play the small pip 100% of the time to ensure that the Q10xxx and K10xxx scenarios are not made more likely by the appearance of a small pip. Hence, RHO's play with KQ10x is restricted not by his own cards and the actual situation but by the hypothetical of a different deal and the need to protect that scenario.

Knowledge of what is going on, plus knowledge of what is occurring in hypotheticals, is critical to determining the likelihood of a particular card being played, therefore, and this knowledge or lack thereof determines odds. Knowledge can be affected, as well, by the position of the cards. For example, with A10 in hand and Qxx on Dummy, in a suit contract, Declarer has a line for 2 tricks in the suit without losers that is materially different than his options with A10 on Dummy and Qxx in hand. So also, J987x in Dummy opposite Ax in hand has different odds concerns than Ax in Dummy and J987x in hand, because of the different knowledge factor.

Flash cards rarely handle these aspects of the case. I have not myself seen any distinction in suit holdings depending on which holding is in Dummy and which concealed in hand, except situation-specific anecdotes.
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#32 User is offline   mike777 

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Posted 2011-October-13, 02:20

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#33 User is offline   glen 

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Posted 2011-October-25, 11:35

Congratulations to Horton, Rodwell, and Master Point Press for book of the year!
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#34 User is offline   Phil 

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Posted 2011-October-25, 12:36

I bought this at the LA regional a few weeks ago and I am enjoying it, but it doesn't hold my interest as much as AICP.

There's some cute hands - the intrapop is especially cool, but AICP is like, "OMFG I've never seen a position like this" and I just drool on the book.
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#35 User is offline   BunnyGo 

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Posted 2011-October-25, 13:59

View PostPhil, on 2011-October-25, 12:36, said:

I bought this at the LA regional a few weeks ago and I am enjoying it, but it doesn't hold my interest as much as AICP.

There's some cute hands - the intrapop is especially cool, but AICP is like, "OMFG I've never seen a position like this" and I just drool on the book.


Yes, but these hands may actually come up...All a matter of taste. I very much enjoy both books.
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#36 User is offline   JLOGIC 

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Posted 2011-October-25, 14:48

View PostBunnyGo, on 2011-October-25, 13:59, said:

Yes, but these hands may actually come up...All a matter of taste. I very much enjoy both books.


+ 1 million. I wish this book existed when I started playing bridge. Rodwell tells you basically every situation that comes up in cardplay, and how to recognize it. I always preach "zomg cardplay is all that matters" and these plays are what I'm talking about. If you can do them at the table routinely, you'll win lots of events, no matter how you bid. If your goal is to win at bridge then Rodwells book is just so much more important than adventures in cardplay.

It kills me that everyone now will know "danger hand high" type situations, it will make the game a ton harder, people almost never do that play even though it's a standard situation that comes up fairly often.*

*- I think it was actually a rodwell bols tip where i even learned it, but I assume this will be way more well read than bols tips
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#37 User is offline   cherdano 

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Posted 2011-October-25, 18:22

This book is unlike any other bridge book I have read. Rodwell really tries to explain (assuming you are familiar with the basics) how to think about declarer play and defense.

Unlike any other book I have seen, it gives space to different topics not according to how many cute example hands the author can dig up, but instead according to Rodwell's judgment of how important they are. It obviously doesn't hurt that he plays thousands of hands each year, and that he started writing this book 20 years ago - you can almost imagine the importance of each topic weighed by the number of IMPs he has seen getting lost over the year at all the tournaments he plays in (from regionals to Bermuda Bowls).

Yes, that means there aren't many pages devoted to transfer trump squeezes (that's what other IBPA awards are for), but it must be one of the most useful declarer play/defense book ever written. Timing, endplays, easy ways to think about orders of suit establishment quickly, etc.

P.S.:
As an aside, I quite liked the fact that he shows quite a few hands where he explains "you have to do X since that works whenever partner has Y or Z", and the concludes "in fact partner had UTV so it didn't actually matter what you do" - somehow that gave following the hands a much more realistic feel.
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#38 User is offline   bluecalm 

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Posted 2012-January-08, 01:54

Quote

and I just drool on the book.


Rodwell's book is more basic in a sense. It's not difficult technically but it emphasizes recognizing patterns and I love it for it. I might be able to work out hands much more difficult that the ones in it in postmortem but if I recognized all situations Rodwell described in his book at the table I would be much better player. I think my chances improved after reading it and will improve even more when I re-read it. Even simply giving a name to the play with some examples/hints strengthen the pattern in reader's head.
If you drool over AICP then try Martens books, especially the ones with animals in titles, they are other thing altogether. I think they are the most beautiful hands ever described. Maybe not that complicated as the ones in AICP and not that practical as the ones in Rodwell files but just amazing (and author makes you think that you should be able to work them out at the table presenting them as problems which is humbling to say the least).
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#39 User is offline   blackshoe 

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Posted 2012-January-08, 10:53

AICP.

When I was in the Navy, I was taught that the first time you use an unusual acronym in correspondence, you spell out what it means, and I still try to do that. This one took me a while to work out, and I'm not 100% sure I'm right. Adventures in Card Play?
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#40 User is offline   inquiry 

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Posted 2012-February-02, 23:33

View Postblackshoe, on 2012-January-08, 10:53, said:

AICP.

When I was in the Navy, I was taught that the first time you use an unusual acronym in correspondence, you spell out what it means, and I still try to do that. This one took me a while to work out, and I'm not 100% sure I'm right. Adventures in Card Play?



without a doubt... best treatment of trump elopement, and that is what he was referring to in his post.
--Ben--

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