BBO Discussion Forums: What's the best way to improve your play? - BBO Discussion Forums

Jump to content

  • 3 Pages +
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • You cannot start a new topic
  • You cannot reply to this topic

What's the best way to improve your play? play includes declare play and defense

Poll: What's the best way to improve your play? (40 member(s) have cast votes)

Declare play

  1. Solving problems on bridge books (4 votes [10.00%])

    Percentage of vote: 10.00%

  2. Reading books that the author gives instructions and examples (15 votes [37.50%])

    Percentage of vote: 37.50%

  3. Software(e.g. BM2000) (11 votes [27.50%])

    Percentage of vote: 27.50%

  4. Play random deal(offline or online) (4 votes [10.00%])

    Percentage of vote: 10.00%

  5. Other (6 votes [15.00%])

    Percentage of vote: 15.00%

Defense

  1. Solving problems on bridge books (5 votes [12.50%])

    Percentage of vote: 12.50%

  2. Reading books that the author gives instructions and examples (15 votes [37.50%])

    Percentage of vote: 37.50%

  3. Software (2 votes [5.00%])

    Percentage of vote: 5.00%

  4. Play random deal(offline or online) (7 votes [17.50%])

    Percentage of vote: 17.50%

  5. Other (11 votes [27.50%])

    Percentage of vote: 27.50%

Vote Guests cannot vote

#41 User is offline   awm 

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • Group: Advanced Members
  • Posts: 7,929
  • Joined: 2005-February-09
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Zurich, Switzerland

Posted 2011-July-24, 13:30

Well, I played for a while in a moderate-stakes money game in the Los Angeles area, which included some of the better players in the city. The stakes were high enough (someone would win or lose a couple hundred dollars most nights) that they mattered to me, but not high enough that losing would put me in serious financial difficulty.

My experience was that it was frustrating how random the results were (i.e. felt like I was just gambling, not playing a game of skill), that a lot of boards turned on players in not-established partnerships having bidding or defensive screw-ups, and that there was little to no real discussion or advice given out after the hands.

I don't think I learned anything significant from it aside from the fact that I prefer to play bridge in a "serious" partnership.
Adam W. Meyerson
a.k.a. Appeal Without Merit
0

#42 User is offline   melind0908 

  • Pip
  • Group: Members
  • Posts: 6
  • Joined: 2011-January-06

Posted 2011-July-26, 06:53

People learn differently. Some need the hands on approach, some need to read, and others will learn better from watching others. My personal learning style is to read from knowledgeable experts and watch their play (kibitzing on vugraph is a great resource for me). Still, when I play for the first time I do not always do what I know. Reviewing the hands afterwards helps to reinforce what perhaps should be obvious. This all reminds me of a learning program. Does anyone remember SQ3r? It is an acronym of sorts. It stands for – Scan, Question, Read, Recite, Review. Saying things out loud can be a strong learning tool.
0

Share this topic:


  • 3 Pages +
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • You cannot start a new topic
  • You cannot reply to this topic

1 User(s) are reading this topic
0 members, 1 guests, 0 anonymous users