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How to read opponents cards by Mike Lawrence

Poll: How to read opponents cards (58 member(s) have cast votes)

Target audience for this bood

  1. Beginner (3 votes [3.06%] - View)

    Percentage of vote: 3.06%

  2. Beginner-Intermediate (11 votes [11.22%] - View)

    Percentage of vote: 11.22%

  3. Intermediate (34 votes [34.69%] - View)

    Percentage of vote: 34.69%

  4. Intermediate-advanced (35 votes [35.71%] - View)

    Percentage of vote: 35.71%

  5. advanced (10 votes [10.20%] - View)

    Percentage of vote: 10.20%

  6. advanced-expert (3 votes [3.06%] - View)

    Percentage of vote: 3.06%

  7. expert (2 votes [2.04%] - View)

    Percentage of vote: 2.04%

How well does this book fit for its target audience

  1. No Stars (0 votes [0.00%])

    Percentage of vote: 0.00%

  2. One Star (0 votes [0.00%])

    Percentage of vote: 0.00%

  3. Two Star (1 votes [1.72%] - View)

    Percentage of vote: 1.72%

  4. Three Star (14 votes [24.14%] - View)

    Percentage of vote: 24.14%

  5. Four Staar (43 votes [74.14%] - View)

    Percentage of vote: 74.14%

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#1 User is offline   inquiry 

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Posted 2010-December-28, 13:09

This is a book, written in the 1970's, is still available today. I frequently recommend it to intermediates and intermediate want-to-be's. Frankly, it would be a useful review for most "advanced" players I know as well. It has a whole bunch of quizes and explains -- in detail -- how to locate missing honors in the opponents hands. Obviously late advanced and higher players already know all of this.

I highly recommend this book for those who have not yet mastered figuring out where the missing honors are "hidding."
--Ben--

#2 User is offline   barmar 

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Posted 2010-December-28, 15:43

It's been a while since I read it, but I remember thinking it was great. In general, I've found Mike Lawrence's books among the most useful and readable of all the bridge books out there, and this is one of his best. A good companion is Inferences at Bridge, by Marshall Miles.

The only problem with these books is that they assume good play by the opponents. If the opponents don't bid or play well, it's hard to figure out what they're doing. So if you're an intermediate playing against other intermediates, their stupid plays are likely to confound your attempts to follow the guidelines in these books.

#3 User is offline   Siegmund 

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Posted 2010-December-29, 03:27

I rated it int-adv rather than plain intermediate -- it IS challenging material, the type of material advanced players should get right and intermediates don't think about. You could almost take the material in this book as what separates int from adv in cardplay. Most intermediates are struggling with more basic aspects of planning the play but will still benefit from reading some of the easier sections of the book, and come back to it as they improve.

This and the card combinations book are the two best of the whole Lawrence bookshelf. Unlike barmar I dislike most of Lawrence on bidding, but I happily recommend these two.
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#4 User is offline   inquiry 

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Posted 2010-December-29, 15:55

View PostSiegmund, on 2010-December-29, 03:27, said:

I rated it int-adv rather than plain intermediate -- it IS challenging material, the type of material advanced players should get right and intermediates don't think about. You could almost take the material in this book as what separates int from adv in cardplay. Most intermediates are struggling with more basic aspects of planning the play but will still benefit from reading some of the easier sections of the book, and come back to it as they improve.

This and the card combinations book are the two best of the whole Lawrence bookshelf. Unlike barmar I dislike most of Lawrence on bidding, but I happily recommend these two.


So... if advanced players "should get it right", and intermediates don't think about it, who should the book be for? The advanced players will get them all right. The intermediates, who what to become advanced, should be the target for this book. This is why I recommend it to intermediate players. I agree, advanced players should have few problems with this book, but there is littel doubt that some will find that they are not thinking along the correct lines until they get back to read a book like this one. I meant the intermeidate-advanced tag to be for high intermediate/low advanced. So somewhere around there is the right target audience for this book. I voted for three groups... intermeidate and the one above it and below it (I allowed multiple votes for the first question).
--Ben--

#5 User is offline   y66 

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Posted 2010-December-29, 20:14

I'm a solid intermediate player. This book helped me understand what it means to think at the table. I gave it the highest rating.
If you lose all hope, you can always find it again. Richard Ford in The Sportswriter
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#6 User is offline   olegru 

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Posted 2010-December-30, 16:06

No doubt it is one of the top 5 bridge book ever written.
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#7 User is offline   Phil 

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Posted 2010-December-30, 17:02

Its a good book, and it really teaches you to think like a good player. None of the subject matter is overly difficult, but a newer player just takes more time to get through the material.

Not in my top 5. More like top 20.
Winner - BBO Challenge bracket #6 - February, 2017.
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#8 User is offline   pooltuna 

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Posted 2010-December-30, 20:45

you definitely need to know this information before you move on to a sequel ..."Partnership Defense" by Kit Woolsey
"Tell me of your home world, Usul"
the Freman, Chani from the move "Dune"

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#9 User is offline   vuroth 

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Posted 2011-August-04, 11:30

I can't imagine any of the kitchen bridge players I know having trouble following this book. For me, the genius isn't in what level needs to know the info, but how clearly it's explained.

Honestly anyone who has played 100 hands of bridge should be able to follow the book, cover to cover.

I liked the book so much I gave it away.
Still decidedly intermediate - don't take my guesses as authoritative.

"gwnn" said:

rule number 1 in efficient forum reading:
hanp does not always mean literally what he writes.
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#10 User is offline   frank0 

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Posted 2011-August-22, 00:08

Thanks for this book I was sucessfully knock out singlenton K in one of the events in summer NABC this year.
:)

In my opinion it should be people's the first book for the purpose of learning card reading
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#11 User is offline   JLOGIC 

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Posted 2011-August-27, 15:12

This is an amazingly good book, and is what bridge is all about
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#12 User is offline   whereagles 

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Posted 2011-August-28, 04:20

Pretty good book, yes. Definitely in the basket of stuff for aspiring players to read.
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#13 User is offline   slothy 

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Posted 2011-August-30, 03:05

One of the first books i ever read on card play when i was struggling to break through the ceiling of intermediacy. Pity it was made of reinforced concrete.

Highly recommended. One of those books that unashamedly indicates to you what you should know and has the knack of deflating your self-esteem when you don't.
gaudium est miseris socios habuisse penarum - Misery loves company.
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#14 User is offline   bluecalm 

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Posted 2012-January-08, 02:05

I had large bridge book collection (as I am book addict). I've chosen to gave it away to other people keeping only few truly great books. That was one of them. I think this is the best intermediate+ book available along with "school of defense" by Martens which sadly you will probably never have a chance to read if you are not from Poland (as it wasn't translated and is very old but quite possibly the best bridge book in history of bridge writing).
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#15 User is offline   the hog 

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Posted 2012-January-08, 04:41

"quite possibly the best bridge book in history of bridge writing)"
Big call. In fact a very big call!
"The King of Hearts a broadsword bears, the Queen of Hearts a rose." W. H. Auden.
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#16 User is offline   bluecalm 

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Posted 2012-January-08, 05:11

Quote

"quite possibly the best bridge book in history of bridge writing)"
Big call. In fact a very big call!


I am willing to discuss but maybe in other thread maybe :)
Do you disagree ? :)
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#17 User is offline   y66 

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Posted 2012-January-08, 09:31

View Postbluecalm, on 2012-January-08, 05:11, said:

I am willing to discuss but maybe in other thread maybe :)
Do you disagree ? :)


Would love to see another thread with some translated excerpts and discussion if you are so inclined and have the time to do this.
If you lose all hope, you can always find it again. Richard Ford in The Sportswriter
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#18 User is offline   Lovera 

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Posted 2014-May-09, 01:10

I suggest also "BRIDGE GAGNANT Tout les secrets de la reussite" written by Bertrand Romanet of International Bridge Accademy and World Champion (In italian language "Tutti i segreti per vincere a bridge" edit MURSIA) about this type of argoument.
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