BBO Discussion Forums: RIP - BBO Discussion Forums

Jump to content

  • 28 Pages +
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
  • Last »
  • You cannot start a new topic
  • You cannot reply to this topic

RIP Memoriam thread?

#41 User is offline   Cyberyeti 

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • Group: Advanced Members
  • Posts: 8,516
  • Joined: 2009-July-13
  • Location:England

Posted 2011-January-06, 17:52

Gerry Rafferty
0

#42 User is offline   PassedOut 

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • Group: Advanced Members
  • Posts: 3,411
  • Joined: 2006-February-21
  • Location:Upper Michigan
  • Interests:Music, films, computer programming, politics, bridge

Posted 2011-January-06, 17:56

Pete Postlethwaite
The growth of wisdom may be gauged exactly by the diminution of ill temper. — Friedrich Nietzsche
The infliction of cruelty with a good conscience is a delight to moralists — that is why they invented hell. — Bertrand Russell
0

#43 User is offline   y66 

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • Group: Advanced Members
  • Posts: 3,357
  • Joined: 2006-February-24

Posted 2011-January-27, 07:58

Daniel Bell, Ardent Appraiser of Politics, Economics and Culture, Dies at 91

By MICHAEL T. KAUFMAN

Daniel Bell, the writer, editor, sociologist and teacher who over seven decades came to epitomize the engaged intellectual as he struggled to reveal the past, comprehend the present and anticipate the future, died on Tuesday at his home in Cambridge, Mass. He was 91.

...

Mr. Bell’s output was prodigious and his range enormous. His major lines of inquiry included the failures of socialism in America, the exhaustion of modern culture and the transformation of capitalism from an industrial-based system to one built on consumerism.
But there was room in his mind for plenty of digressions. He wrote about the changing structure of organized crime and even the growing popularity of gangsta rap among white, middle-class, suburban youth.

Two of Mr. Bell’s books, “The End of Ideology” (1960) and the “Cultural Contradictions of Capitalism” (1978), were ranked among the 100 most influential books since World War II by The Times Literary Supplement in London. In titling “The End of Ideology” and another work, “The Coming of Post-Industrial Society” (1973), Mr. Bell coined terms that have entered common usage.

In “The End of Ideology” he contended — nearly three decades before the collapse of Communism — that ideologies that had once driven global politics were losing force and thus providing openings for newer galvanizing beliefs to gain toeholds. In “The Coming of Post-Industrial Society,” he foresaw the global spread of service-based economies as generators of capital and employment, supplanting those dominated by manufacturing or agriculture.

...

Daniel Bolotsky was born on the Lower East Side of Manhattan on May 10, 1919, to Benjamin and Anna Bolotsky, garment workers and immigrants from Eastern Europe. His father died when Daniel was eight months old, and Daniel, his mother and his older brother, Leo, moved in with relatives. The family changed the name to Bell when Daniel was 13.

Mr. Bell liked to tell of his political beginnings with an anecdote about his bar mitzvah, in 1932. “I said to the Rabbi: ‘I’ve found the truth. I don’t believe in God. I’m joining the Young People’s Socialist League.’ So he looked at me and said, ‘Kid, you don’t believe in God. Tell me, do you think God cares?’ ”

Mr. Bell did join the League and as an adolescent delivered sidewalk speeches for Norman Thomas, the Socialist candidate for president. By the time he had graduated fromStuyvesant High School in Manhattan and entered City College in the late 1930s, he was well grounded in the Socialist and Marxist canon and well aware of the leftist landscape, with its bitter rivalries and schisms.

At City College, he had no trouble finding his way to Alcove No. 1 in the cafeteria, where, among the anti-Stalinist socialists who dominated that nook, he found a remarkable cohort that challenged and sustained him for much of his life as it helped to define America’s political spectrum over the last half of the 20th century.

Its principal members, in addition to Mr. Bell, included Mr. Kristol, whose eventual move to the right as a founding neoconservative led Mr. Bell to leave The Public Interest in 1972 while steadfastly affirming his friendship for his old school chum.

There was Irving Howe, the late critic, professor and editor of the leftist journal Dissent, who remained a Social Democrat. And there was Nathan Glazer, who would become Mr. Bell’s colleague in the Harvard sociology department, the author, with Daniel Patrick Moynihan, of “Beyond the Melting Pot,” and the architect of strategies for school integration. In 1998 the four men were the subjects of a documentary film by Joseph Dorman titled “Arguing the World.”

The atmosphere of City College in the ’30s was supercharged with leftist ideology. There were Communists and Socialists, Stalinists and Trotskyites, all giving vent to their views in the years of the Spanish Civil War just before Hitler’s pact with Stalin paved the way to world war.

In the film, Mr. Bell described the atmosphere in the cafeteria as “kind of a heder,” referring to the Jewish religious schools where arguing a variety of views and redefining positions was the basis of learning. He graduated in 1939.

Mr. Bell never hesitated to expand and revise his thinking through the years. New editions of his older books often include new prefaces and afterwords that look at his old arguments in the light of new developments in politics and society. And he was always quick to point out what he regarded as misconceptions about his work and his life.

In 2003, for example, an article by James Atlas in The Times described him and Mr. Kristol as neoconservatives who had felt that the Vietnam War had a “persuasive rationale.” He answered with a letter that declared, “I was not and never have been a ‘neoconservative.’ Nor did I support the war.”

Indeed, for all the ideological wars he had witnessed, Mr. Bell disdained labels, particularly as they were applied to him. Over the years he would offer his own political profile, declaring what he called his “triune” view of himself: “a socialist in economics, a liberal in politics and a conservative in culture.”

If you lose all hope, you can always find it again. Richard Ford in The Sportswriter
0

#44 User is offline   PassedOut 

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • Group: Advanced Members
  • Posts: 3,411
  • Joined: 2006-February-21
  • Location:Upper Michigan
  • Interests:Music, films, computer programming, politics, bridge

Posted 2011-February-06, 11:53

Tura Satana
The growth of wisdom may be gauged exactly by the diminution of ill temper. — Friedrich Nietzsche
The infliction of cruelty with a good conscience is a delight to moralists — that is why they invented hell. — Bertrand Russell
0

#45 User is offline   Cyberyeti 

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • Group: Advanced Members
  • Posts: 8,516
  • Joined: 2009-July-13
  • Location:England

Posted 2011-February-08, 06:33

Gary Moore
0

#46 User is offline   paulg 

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • Group: Advanced Members
  • Posts: 4,020
  • Joined: 2003-April-26
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Scottish Borders

Posted 2011-February-08, 07:39

Ken Olsen, the founder of minicomputer and client/server company Digital Equipment Corporation (DEC) died on Sunday. He was 84 years-old (The Register).

For my generation DEC was the company that changed computing. No longer sending batches of punch cards away to the mainframe and getting your results back, normally a space in the wrong place in the input, a day or two later. Especially for scientists and engineers, the ability to actually see the computer let alone debug programs through the front panel was amazing.
0

#47 User is offline   y66 

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • Group: Advanced Members
  • Posts: 3,357
  • Joined: 2006-February-24

Posted 2011-March-12, 17:04

James Elliot Is Dead at 67; Discovered Rings of Uranus

Posted Image
Photo by Calvin Hamilton/JPL, via NASA

James Elliot used the light from distant stars to help discover the very faint rings of the planet.

Quote

In 1977, using a telescope in an airplane, Dr. Elliot led a team of Cornell University scientists to observe the planet Uranus when it passed between Earth and a star. Flying at night over a patch of the Indian Ocean where Uranus’s shadow was to be cast, he had the foresight to turn on his equipment more than a half-hour early. This allowed him to record a series of slight dimmings that provided the first evidence of Uranus’s rings.

“This is science deeply rooted in preparation and planning, with only minutes of execution,” said Michael Person, an astronomer at M.I.T. who worked with Dr. Elliot. “You have to be there, prepared and ready, observing at the right time, or you don’t get it.”

The Uranus researchers — Dr. Elliot, Edward Dunham and Douglas Mink — were aboard the Kuiper Airborne Observatory, a National Aeronautics and Space Administration jet that flew above the clouds to gather unobstructed images of the stellar eclipse through a mounted three-foot telescope.

“He spent the whole flight pacing in a circle, so his headset wire would get twisted up, and he had to unplug and uncurl it,” said Dr. Dunham, who is now at Lowell Observatory in Flagstaff, Ariz. “We worked until the sun came up, and the pilot was running out of gas, and we had to go home.”

...

Dr. Elliot’s penchant for preparation was apparent at home. A few years ago he drew up a list called “Jobs for Grandchildren.” When reminded that he did not yet have any grandchildren, he replied, “They aren’t things I need to have done soon.”

If you lose all hope, you can always find it again. Richard Ford in The Sportswriter
0

#48 User is offline   y66 

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • Group: Advanced Members
  • Posts: 3,357
  • Joined: 2006-February-24

Posted 2011-April-06, 20:19

Bernard Clayton Jr., Cookbook Author, Is Dead at 94
By WILLIAM GRIMES

Bernard Clayton Jr., a newspaper reporter whose love for fresh bread inspired him to master the art of baking and write several classic cookbooks on bread and pastry, died on March 28 in Bloomington, Ind. He was 94.

His death was confirmed by his wife, Marjorie.

Mr. Clayton experienced a bread-baking epiphany while bicycling across Europe with his wife in 1965. The quality of the breads, gratifying to appetites sharpened by a hard day’s ride, impressed him deeply. Although he had never baked so much as a muffin in his life, he embarked on a quest to explore the intricacies of bread and pastry making.

His hobby developed into an obsession, which became a career. Over the next decade, he traveled around the world and logged countless hours in his home kitchen, newly outfitted with a professional oven, mastering the techniques and the recipes that he presented in “The Complete Book of Breads.”

First published in 1973, it became a twin to James Beard’s “Beard on Bread” on the shelves of American home cooks. It was periodically updated, most recently in 2003, under the title “Bernard Clayton’s New Complete Book of Breads.”

A 7,000-mile research trip that took him to bakeries all over France led to “The Breads of France” (1978), a comprehensive cookbook that guided the reader through French bread in all forms, from the leaf-shaped fougasse of Provence to the bagels served at Goldenberg’s deli in the Marais neighborhood of Paris.

Bernard Clayton Jr. was born on Dec. 25, 1916, in Rochester, Ind. His father owned and edited The Zionsville Times, a weekly newspaper, and his son, after attending Indiana University for two years, signed on as a reporter for The Indianapolis News.

He was soon hired by Life magazine as a photo editor and later ran the Time-Life bureaus in Chicago and San Francisco. During World War II, he was a military correspondent for Time and Life. After the war, he ran Pacific News, a magazine-distribution company, in Honolulu, before embarking on a career in public relations.

In 1964, Mr. Clayton dropped out of the corporate world and began traveling by car, bicycle, canal boat and horse-drawn Gypsy wagon in the United States and Europe with his wife. Two years later, he was recruited by Indiana University’s news bureau to oversee a special project for six months. He stayed for 14 years as a writer and editor before retiring in 1980.
If you lose all hope, you can always find it again. Richard Ford in The Sportswriter
0

#49 User is offline   blackshoe 

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • Group: Advanced Members
  • Posts: 15,816
  • Joined: 2006-April-17
  • Location:Rochester, NY

Posted 2011-April-06, 21:23

I knew that name was familiar — I have his Complete Book of Breads, the '73 edition.
--------------------
As for tv, screw it. You aren't missing anything. -- Ken Berg
I have come to realise it is futile to expect or hope a regular club game will be run in accordance with the laws. -- Jillybean
0

#50 User is offline   y66 

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • Group: Advanced Members
  • Posts: 3,357
  • Joined: 2006-February-24

Posted 2011-April-29, 06:51

Bill Cook, Medical Device Maker
By DOUGLAS MARTIN

Quote

Bill Cook’s first business venture — selling shot glasses with pictures of nude women on the bottom — flopped. But that did not stop him from developing a sprawling company that has made thousands of medical devices, including heart stents, urological equipment and living-tissue transplants.

Along the way he amassed a $3.1 billion fortune, making him the 101st richest American in 2011, according to Forbes magazine. And yet he lived a modest life. He and his wife, Gayle, continued to live in the three-bedroom home they bought in 1967, having moved there from an apartment where they had used a spare bedroom to make a new sort of catheter.

... Mr. Cook was not widely known outside Indiana, where he sprinkled many millions in gifts. Certainly his products — used to treat conditions from heart attacks to incontinence — were not household names. But he built a 42-company empire with annual sales of $1.7 billion that spanned four continents and employed 10,000 people.

He started work every day at 5 a.m.; liked chatting with old friends in barbershops and luncheonettes and, four years ago, finally built a garage. Until then he had been scraping the snow and ice off his windshield himself. Though he was a billionaire, he had no driver.

Mr. Cook fit no obvious category. He sometimes drove the bus that took his friend, the singer John Mellencamp, on tour.

He and his wife led in the restoration of many Indiana buildings, including 40 on the National Register of Historic Places. He built a casino in French Lick, Ind., in the shape of a boat to comply with a law allowing only riverboat gambling. A moat encircles it.

His was certainly the only medical supply company ever to produce a Broadway show, “Blast!” in 2001. The show grew out of his long sponsorship of a champion local drum and bugle corps. (He drove the bus.) “Blast!,” an exuberant tribute to brass and percussion by Hoosier musicians, won Tony and Emmy awards (the Emmy for a televised production on PBS).

... William Alfred Cook was born on Jan. 27, 1931, in Mattoon, Ill., and grew up in Canton, Ill., where he played three sports, sang in the choir and played in piano competitions. After earning a biology degree from Northwestern University, failing at his shot-glass brainstorm and serving in the Army, he became the catalog editor for a hospital supply firm, where he liked imagining new products. One was disposable hypodermic needles.

In 1957 he married Gayle Karch, who survives him, along with their son, Carl, and a granddaughter. The next year, he started a company in Chicago, MPL Inc., to make hypodermic needles. It became the nation’s third-largest needle maker. He moved to Bloomington after being waylaid there in a blizzard and liking it.

In 1963, he and his wife started what became the Cook Group. They invested $1,500 in a blowtorch, soldering iron and plastic tubing to make catheters in their apartment. Mr. Cook wore a tie and coat as a means of self-discipline. Their first sale: two catheters at $7.50 each.

At a medical trade show in 1964, Mr. Cook was using a Bunsen burner to demonstrate making catheters from plastic tubing when a man wandered by to ask if he could borrow the equipment, as the exhibit was closing for the day.

He was Dr. Charles T. Dotter, who developed angioplasty, the technique of mechanically widening an obstructed blood vessel. He returned the next morning with 15 exquisitely made catheters, and Mr. Cook promptly sold them for $10 apiece. They went on to form a mutually beneficial association in many projects over the years.

Mr. Cook, like many billionaires, had luck. A local jeweler asked if he would hire his 17-year-old son, Thomas Osborne, who was not good in school but who was handy. Sure, Mr. Cook said. The young man soon made a prototype machine to wind wire used to guide a catheter.

“His name’s on almost every patent,” Mr. Cook said of Mr. Osborne, who went on to make a career at Cook. “The kid was just destined.”

... Not everything Mr. Cook touched turned golden. In 1991, he bought the money-losing Manchester United basketball team in Britain for almost nothing. He was offered United’s soccer team as part of the deal, for a price under $25 million, but he said no. It is now worth $1.86 billion.

If you lose all hope, you can always find it again. Richard Ford in The Sportswriter
0

#51 User is offline   y66 

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • Group: Advanced Members
  • Posts: 3,357
  • Joined: 2006-February-24

Posted 2011-May-07, 01:16

Posted Image
Photo: AP

From today's NYT

Quote

Seve Ballesteros, the charismatic Spanish golfer who won the Masters twice and the British Open three times and helped propel Europe’s rise in the Ryder Cup competition with the United States, died early Saturday at his home in northern Spain, where his struggle with brain cancer had gained wide attention in the sports world. He was 54.

Ballesteros was only 19 and virtually unknown when he was thrust into the golf spotlight in July 1976. He was on the final hole of the British Open at Royal Birkdale, on England’s western coast, when he hit a brilliant chip shot between two bunkers that landed four feet from the cup. He then sank his putt to tie Jack Nicklaus for second place behind Johnny Miller after having led for three rounds.

That daring chip, and the shots before it that rescued him after wild drives into dunes and bushes, caught the golf world’s attention and defined the kind of game that made Ballesteros one of the finest players of his era.

With a passion for perfection, an uncommon intensity and a brilliant short game, Ballesteros won five major championships in a 10-year span. At Augusta National in 1980, he became the first European and, at 23, the youngest player to win the Masters. (Tiger Woods became the youngest in 1997 when he won the Masters at 21.) Ballesteros won the Masters again in 1983, captured the British Open in 1979, 1984 and 1988, and won the World Match Play Championship five times.

If you lose all hope, you can always find it again. Richard Ford in The Sportswriter
0

#52 User is offline   paulg 

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • Group: Advanced Members
  • Posts: 4,020
  • Joined: 2003-April-26
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Scottish Borders

Posted 2011-May-07, 02:20

My abiding memory of Seve is his birdie at the final hole of the 1984 Open ... http://www.youtube.c...s&feature=share



Edit: updated link
0

#53 User is offline   Fluffy 

  • World International Master without a clue
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • Group: Advanced Members
  • Posts: 17,346
  • Joined: 2003-November-13
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:madrid

Posted 2011-May-07, 04:45

View Postpaulg, on 2011-May-07, 02:20, said:

My abiding memory of Seve is his birdie at the final hole of the 1984 Open ... http://youtu.be/30comFnFZOs.

youtu.be doesn't work for me.

Quoting my brother: Now we have have Nadal, Xavi, Iniesta, Alonso, Gasol etc, but back on that day when we were childs we had only one, and that was Seve. Will miss you.
0

#54 User is offline   y66 

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • Group: Advanced Members
  • Posts: 3,357
  • Joined: 2006-February-24

Posted 2011-May-07, 08:58

I followed Ballesteros and Olazábal vs Azinger and Beck on day 1 of the 1991 Ryder Cup and vs Floyd and Couples on day 2. It was something to see the most competitive golfers of that era -- Floyd, Ballesteros and Azinger -- playing against each other and to feel the energy coming from those matches. That energy is the coolest thing in golf and nobody produced more of it than Ballesteros.
If you lose all hope, you can always find it again. Richard Ford in The Sportswriter
0

#55 User is offline   Cyberyeti 

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • Group: Advanced Members
  • Posts: 8,516
  • Joined: 2009-July-13
  • Location:England

Posted 2011-June-28, 02:12

Bill Haast http://www.telegraph...Bill-Haast.html

Snakes have always fascinated me, and I remember seeing him on documentaries many times.

And to add a bridge one, Michelle Brunner http://www.ebu.co.uk...ellebrunner.htm
0

#56 User is offline   gordontd 

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • Group: Advanced Members
  • Posts: 3,678
  • Joined: 2009-July-14
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:London

Posted 2011-June-28, 02:23

Yes, indeed Michelle Brunner's death is a sad loss. She battled on for so long, still playing top class bridge when it was a struggle just to get there.
Gordon Rainsford
London UK
0

#57 User is offline   paulg 

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • Group: Advanced Members
  • Posts: 4,020
  • Joined: 2003-April-26
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Scottish Borders

Posted 2011-June-28, 03:36

View Postgordontd, on 2011-June-28, 02:23, said:

Yes, indeed Michelle Brunner's death is a sad loss. She battled on for so long, still playing top class bridge when it was a struggle just to get there.

She played at least one Camrose match where she was almost unable to leave the playing area and spent the break in the organisers room chatting to all of us rather than battle her way downstairs. Amazing that she could still maintain concentration and performance in these circumstances and I think it was an indication of how highly she was regarded that her NPCs were happy to play her despite the obvious discomfort that she was in.

Sad to see such a competitor leave us too soon.


0

#58 User is offline   luke warm 

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • Group: Advanced Members
  • Posts: 6,951
  • Joined: 2003-September-07
  • Gender:Male
  • Interests:Bridge, poker, politics

Posted 2011-June-28, 03:58

marshal dillon and columbo, rip
"Paul Krugman is a stupid person's idea of what a smart person sounds like." Newt Gingrich (paraphrased)
0

#59 User is offline   Cyberyeti 

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • Group: Advanced Members
  • Posts: 8,516
  • Joined: 2009-July-13
  • Location:England

Posted 2011-July-14, 02:50

Würzel
http://www.metro.co....int-of-guinness
0

#60 User is offline   y66 

  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • Group: Advanced Members
  • Posts: 3,357
  • Joined: 2006-February-24

Posted 2011-August-24, 03:23

Igniting a Revolution, Starting with ‘Hound Dog’ -- by Stephen Holden

Posted Image
Photo: Reuters

Jerry Leiber, left at the piano, with Mike Stoller, along with, standing from left, Lester Sill, Jerry Wexler, members of the Coasters and, far right, Ahmet Ertegun, in 1959. Mr. Leiber and Mr. Stoller wrote hits like “Jailhouse Rock” and “Stand By Me.”
If you lose all hope, you can always find it again. Richard Ford in The Sportswriter
0

Share this topic:


  • 28 Pages +
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
  • Last »
  • You cannot start a new topic
  • You cannot reply to this topic

2 User(s) are reading this topic
0 members, 2 guests, 0 anonymous users